eosinophilic

(redirected from eosinophilic meningitis)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia.
Related to eosinophilic meningitis: Angiostrongylus cantonensis

e·o·sin·o·phil·ic

 (ē′ə-sĭn′ə-fĭl′ĭk)
adj.
1. Easily stained by eosin or other acid dyes. Used of a cell or cell structure.
2. Of or relating to eosinophils.

e•o•sin•o•phil•ic

(ˌi əˌsɪn əˈfɪl ɪk)

also e•o•si•noph•i•lous

(-sɪˈnɒf ə ləs)

eosinophil,



adj.
having an affinity for eosin and other acid dyes; acidophilic.
[1895–1900]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.eosinophilic - of or relating to eosinophil
Translations

e·o·sin·o·phil·ic

a. eosinófilo-a, que tiene afinidad con o por la eosina.
References in periodicals archive ?
To ascertain the presence of this parasite in patients with eosinophilic meningitis in Laos, we tested samples from a cohort of 1,065 patients suspected of having CNS infection at Mahosot Hospital, Vientiane, Laos, during 2003-2013 by Giemsa staining and identified 54 CSF samples containing [greater than or equal to]10% eosinophils.
When it infects humans, the parasite can make its way to the brain and die there, causing eosinophilic meningitis that can lead to coma or death.
The discovery of Angiostrongylus cantonensis as a cause of human eosinophilic meningitis.
Analysis of CSF was consistent with eosinophilic meningitis (60% eosinophils), and Baylisascaris procyonis antibody was detected in both blood and CSF.
Human infection typically manifests as acute eosinophilic meningitis or meningoencephalitis; in up to 30% of cases there is a peripheral eosinophilia.
He also has been involved in clinical research on the parasite, Angiostrongylus cantonensis, responsible for most cases of eosinophilic meningitis, world-wide.
A spinal tap and cell count unexpectedly gave clinicians a shocking discovery: They had an outbreak of eosinophilic meningitis.
Other symptoms are specific to the organ involved and include hepatic granulomas, chronic prurigo, pruritus, urticaria, eczema, vasculitis, eosinophilic meningitis or encephalitis, myelitis, optic neuritis, radiculitis, cranial nerve palsy, and, less commonly, myocarditis, nephrotic syndrome, and arthritis.
Other symptoms are specific to organs involved and include hepatic granulomas, chronic prurigo, pruritus, urticaria, eczema, vasculitis, eosinophilic meningitis or encephalitis, myelitis, optic neuritis, radiculitis, cranial nerve palsy, and, less commonly, myocarditis, nephrotic syndrome, and arthritis.
The organism most commonly causing eosinophilic meningitis is a rat lung worm called angiostrongylus cantonensis.
Angiostrongylus cantonensis, a nematode that is the most common infectious cause of eosinophilic meningitis and meningoencephalitis both worldwide and in areas of Southeast Asia and many Pacific Islands, is one of the most important zoonotic parasites in Taiwan (1, 2).
cantonensis in Jamaica subsequent to an outbreak of human cases of eosinophilic meningitis in 2000.

Full browser ?