epanaphora


Also found in: Thesaurus, Wikipedia.

epanaphora

(ˌɛpəˈnæfərə)
n
(Grammar) rhetoric another word for anaphora
ˌepanˈaphoral adj

epanaphora

a rhetorical device consisting of repetition of a word or phrase at the beginning of successive sentences. Cf. anaphora.
See also: Rhetoric and Rhetorical Devices
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.epanaphora - repetition of a word or phrase at the beginning of successive clauses
repetition - the repeated use of the same word or word pattern as a rhetorical device
References in periodicals archive ?
Pound's rhetorical use of epanaphora begins soon after: "And Henri Gaudier went to it, / and they killed him," and "ole T.
To this end, the closing chapters of the book meticulously catalog Hobbes's employment in the Leviathan of the tropes of irony, sarcasm, aestismus (inherently ambiguous descriptions of adversaries), and diasyrmus (likening one argument to another of patent absurdity), as well as a host of figures of speech, principally antithesis, epanaphora, dubitatio, epanodos, percontatio, apodioxis, meiosis, litotes, and tapinosis.
At Gettysburg, Abraham Lincoln omitted idiomatic conjunctions between the last two elements of his anaphora or epanaphora (like beginnings) in "we cannot dedicate, we cannot consecrate, we cannot hallow this ground" and his epistrophe or antistrophe (like endings) in "government of the people, by the people, for the people.