epanorthosis


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epanorthosis

(ɪˌpænɔːˈθəʊsɪs)
n
(Rhetoric) rhetoric the almost immediate replacement of a preceding word or phrase by a more correct or more emphatic one, as for example in thousands, nay, millions
[C16: from Greek: correction, from epi- + ana- + orthos straight]
ˌepanorˈthotic adj

epanorthosis

a rhetorical device in which something just said is repeated and stronger or more apt words are substituted.
See also: Rhetoric and Rhetorical Devices

epanorthosis

The immediate replacement, in order to achieve an effect of stress, of one word or phrase by another that is considered more correct.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.epanorthosis - immediate rephrasing for intensification or justification; "Seems, madam! Nay, it is"
rhetorical device - a use of language that creates a literary effect (but often without regard for literal significance)
References in periodicals archive ?
Poe's overuse of the dash has been noticed by some critics (Levin, for instance) and, according to Poe's understanding of how that punctuational mark should be used, it is apparent that he often employs the dash to stand in for metanoia or epanorthosis.
Still, it is difficult to distinguish between metanoia and epanorthosis, sometimes called "correctic.
Starting with the Sonnets, Hammond argues that Shakespeare "seems addicted to multiple definitions which by their sheer proliferation over-delineate, perpetually redescribing the young man, the poet, and their relationship" (63), through the use of correctio or epanorthosis, and paradiastole (redescription).