epic


Also found in: Thesaurus, Legal, Acronyms, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to epic: epic poetry

ep·ic

 (ĕp′ĭk)
n.
1. An extended narrative poem in elevated or dignified language, celebrating the feats of a legendary or traditional hero.
2. A literary or dramatic composition that resembles an extended narrative poem celebrating heroic feats.
3. A series of events considered appropriate to an epic: the epic of the Old West.
adj.
1. Of, constituting, having to do with, or suggestive of a literary epic: an epic poem.
2. Surpassing the usual or ordinary, particularly in scope or size: "A vast musical panorama ... it requires an epic musical understanding to do it justice" (Tim Page).
3. Heroic and impressive in quality: "Here in the courtroom ... there was more of that epic atmosphere, the extra amperage of a special moment" (Scott Turow).

[From Latin epicus, from Greek epikos, from epos, word, song; see wekw- in Indo-European roots.]

ep′i·cal·ly adv.

epic

(ˈɛpɪk)
n
1. (Poetry) a long narrative poem recounting in elevated style the deeds of a legendary hero, esp one originating in oral folk tradition
2. (Poetry) the genre of epic poetry
3. (Art Terms) any work of literature, film, etc, having heroic deeds for its subject matter or having other qualities associated with the epic: a Hollywood epic.
4. an episode in the lives of men in which heroic deeds are performed or attempted: the epic of Scott's expedition to the South Pole.
adj
5. denoting, relating to, or characteristic of an epic or epics
6. of heroic or impressive proportions: an epic voyage.
[C16: from Latin epicus, from Greek epikos, from epos speech, word, song]

ep•ic

(ˈɛp ɪk)

adj. Also, ep′i•cal.
1. of or pertaining to a long poetic composition, usu. centered upon a hero, in which a series of great achievements or events is narrated in elevated style: The Iliad is an epic poem.
2. resembling or suggesting such poetry: an epic novel.
3. heroic; majestic; impressively great.
4. of unusually great size or extent: a crime wave of epic proportions.
n.
5. an epic poem.
6. epic poetry.
7. a novel, film, etc., resembling or suggesting an epic.
8. something worthy to form the subject of an epic.
[1580–90; < Latin epicus < Greek epikós. See epos, -ic]
ep′i•cal•ly, adv.

epic

A long narrative poem usually concerning a central character of heroic stature, or incidents of national or tribal importance.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.epic - a long narrative poem telling of a hero's deeds
poem, verse form - a composition written in metrical feet forming rhythmical lines
chanson de geste - Old French epic poems
rhapsody - an epic poem adapted for recitation
heroic, heroic meter, heroic verse - a verse form suited to the treatment of heroic or elevated themes; dactylic hexameter or iambic pentameter
Adj.1.epic - very imposing or impressive; surpassing the ordinary (especially in size or scale); "an epic voyage"; "of heroic proportions"; "heroic sculpture"
big, large - above average in size or number or quantity or magnitude or extent; "a large city"; "set out for the big city"; "a large sum"; "a big (or large) barn"; "a large family"; "big businesses"; "a big expenditure"; "a large number of newspapers"; "a big group of scientists"; "large areas of the world"
2.epic - constituting or having to do with or suggestive of a literary epic; "epic tradition"

epic

noun
1. saga, legend, adventure, chronicle, long story, long poem the Anglo-Saxon epic, `Beowulf'
Translations
قَصيدَه ملْحَمِيَّهمَلْحَمَه
epos
episkeposheltedigtstorslået
eeposeeppinenmahtavamieletön
epikus mûeposz
söguljóî, hetjuljóî
epasepopėja
epossvēstījums par vēsturisku tēmu
epopejaepos
destandestansı

epic

[ˈepɪk]
A. ADJépico (fig) → excepcional, épico
B. Nepopeya f; (= film) → película f épica

epic

[ˈɛpɪk]
n (= poem, book, film) → épopée f
adj
[poem] → épique
(= tremendous) [voyage, victory] → héroïque

epic

adj poetryepisch; novelmonumental; performance, match, strugglegewaltig; journeylang und abenteuerlich; epic filmMonumentalfilm m; of epic proportionsvon monumentalen Ausmaßen
n (= poem)Epos nt, → Heldengedicht nt; (= film, novel)Epos nt, → monumentaler Film/Roman; (= match)gewaltiges Spiel; an epic of the screen (Film) → ein Filmepos nt

epic

[ˈɛpɪk]
1. adjepico/a
2. npoema m epico, epopea; (film) → epopea

epic

(ˈepik) noun
1. a long poem telling a story of great deeds.
2. a long story, film etc telling of great deeds especially historic.
References in classic literature ?
The early Greek epic -- that is, poetry as a natural and popular, and not (as it became later) an artificial and academic literary form -- passed through the usual three phases, of development, of maturity, and of decline.
So reconstructed, the earliest period appears to us as a time of slow development in which the characteristic epic metre, diction, and structure grew up slowly from crude elements and were improved until the verge of maturity was reached.
If they continued to sing like their great predecessor of romantic themes, they were drawn as by a kind of magnetic attraction into the Homeric style and manner of treatment, and became mere echoes of the Homeric voice: in a word, Homer had so completely exhausted the epic genre, that after him further efforts were doomed to be merely conventional.
People do, indeed, add the word 'maker' or 'poet' to the name of the metre, and speak of elegiac poets, or epic (that is, hexameter) poets, as if it were not the imitation that makes the poet, but the verse that entitles them all indiscriminately to the name.
Theresa's passionate, ideal nature demanded an epic life: what were many-volumed romances of chivalry and the social conquests of a brilliant girl to her?
Many Theresas have been born who found for themselves no epic life wherein there was a constant unfolding of far-resonant action; perhaps only a life of mistakes, the offspring of a certain spiritual grandeur ill-matched with the meanness of opportunity; perhaps a tragic failure which found no sacred poet and sank unwept into oblivion.
We have scarcely spoken of an epic since that first of all our epics, the Story of Beowulf.
It follows from all this that the ultimate, aggregate, or absolute effect of even the best epic under the sun, is a nullity: -- and this is precisely the fact.
In regard to the Iliad, we have, if not positive proof, at least very good reason for believing it intended as a series of lyrics; but, granting the epic intention, I can say only that the work is based in an imperfect sense of art.
Out of the popular ballads, or, chiefly, of the minstrel poetry which is partly based on them, regularly develops epic poetry.
By far the most important remaining example is the epic 'Beowulf,' of about three thousand lines.
The British Constitution was to Montesquieu what Homer has been to the didactic writers on epic poetry.