epicardium


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ep·i·car·di·um

 (ĕp′ĭ-kär′dē-əm)
n. pl. ep·i·car·di·a (-dē-ə)
The inner layer of the pericardium that is in actual contact with the surface of the heart.

[New Latin : epi- + Greek kardiā, heart; see kerd- in Indo-European roots.]

ep′i·car′di·al adj.

epicardium

(ˌɛpɪˈkɑːdɪəm)
n, pl -dia (-dɪə)
(Anatomy) anatomy the innermost layer of the pericardium, in direct contact with the heart
[C19: New Latin, from epi- + Greek kardia heart]
ˌepiˈcardiac, ˌepiˈcardial adj

ep•i•car•di•um

(ˌɛp ɪˈkɑr di əm)

n., pl. -di•a (-di ə)
the innermost layer of the pericardium.
[1860–65]
ep`i•car′di•al, ep`i•car′di•ac`, adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.epicardium - the innermost of the two layers of the pericardium
pericardium - a serous membrane with two layers that surrounds the heart
serosa, serous membrane - a thin membrane lining the closed cavities of the body; has two layers with a space between that is filled with serous fluid
Translations

ep·i·car·di·um

n. epicardio, cara visceral del pericardio.
References in periodicals archive ?
A total of 300 mL pericardial effusion was evacuated with no fungal or bacterial growth; the epicardium appeared inflamed.
But studies of zebra fish showed that stimulating the epicardium, a sac of fibrous tissue surrounding the heart, can theoretically trigger heart regeneration.
We will study the role of macrophages and particularly analyse a subtype, which accumulates in the outer mesothelial layer of the heart, the epicardium.
Histologic analysis revealed a multinodular mass extending from the atria, running along the epicardium distally, and often extending into the myocardium.
13) The simplest criterion for diagnosis is that the distance from the epicardial surface to the peak of trabeculations is at least double the distance from the surface of the epicardium to the trough of ventricular trabeculations.
Epicardial fat tissue (EFT) is a component of visceral fat tissue located around the heart between myocardial and visceral epicardium.
In the systolic and diastolic phases of heartbeat, two contour lines were drawn to delineate the endocardium and epicardium.
To record optical action potentials, the epicardium was illuminated using an LED spotlight (530/35 nM; Mightex, Pleasanton, CA).
Other findings included petechial hemorrhages in epicardium and endocardium and congestion of the lungs; all other organs appeared normal.
There was bloody intestinal content, petechiae in the mucosa of the urinary bladder, and also petechiae and ecchymoses in the pericardium and epicardium.