epicure


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Related to epicure: Epicurus

ep·i·cure

 (ĕp′ĭ-kyo͝or′)
n.
1. A person with refined taste, especially in food and wine.
2. A person devoted to sensuous pleasure and luxurious living.

[Middle English, an Epicurean, from Medieval Latin epicūrus, from Latin Epicūrus, Epicurus, from Greek Epikouros.]

epicure

(ˈɛpɪˌkjʊə)
n
1. a person who cultivates a discriminating palate for the enjoyment of good food and drink; gourmet
2. a person devoted to sensual pleasures
[C16: from Medieval Latin epicūrus, after Epicurus; see Epicurean]
ˈepicurˌism n

ep•i•cure

(ˈɛp ɪˌkyʊər)

n.
1. a person who cultivates a refined taste, esp. in food and wine; connoisseur.
2. Archaic. a person dedicated to sensual enjoyment.
[1555–65; < Latin Epicūrēus (see epicurean)]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.epicure - a person devoted to refined sensuous enjoyment (especially good food and drink)epicure - a person devoted to refined sensuous enjoyment (especially good food and drink)
sensualist - a person who enjoys sensuality

epicure

noun gourmet, foodie, glutton, epicurean, hedonist, gourmand, bon vivant (French), gastronome, sensualist, sybarite, voluptuary These delicacies will delight gastronomes and epicures.

epicure

noun
A person devoted to pleasure and luxury:
Translations

epicure

[ˈepɪkjʊəʳ] Ngastrónomo/a m/f

epicure

nFeinschmecker(in) m(f)

epicure

[ˈɛpɪkjʊəʳ] nbuongustaio/a
References in classic literature ?
Many exquisite viands might be rejected by the epicure, if it was a sufficient cause for his contemning of them as common and vulgar, that something was to be found in the most paltry alleys under the same name.
The hump meat afforded them a repast fit for an epicure.
He would have been seven times more Epicure, and atheist, than he was.
There is nothing so expressive as the face of an epicure who finds himself before a well spread table, so La Ramee, when receiving his plate of soup from Grimaud, presented a type of perfect bliss.
As an epicure snatches a taste of every dish which is successively brought to table, he not having allowed himself time to enjoy the one before, so have I gone from one subject to another without having discovered what I sought at first, the nature of justice.
But he thought it was very bad indeed, and his quarrel with Newman was that this unregulated epicure had a sadly insufficient perception of the bad.
The casket of the skull is broken into with an axe, and the two plump, whitish lobes being withdrawn (precisely resembling two large puddings), they are then mixed with flour, and cooked into a most delectable mess, in flavor somewhat resembling calves' head, which is quite a dish among some epicures; and every one knows that some young bucks among the epicures, by continually dining upon calves' brains, by and by get to have a little brains of their own, so as to be able to tell a calf's head from their own heads; which, indeed, requires uncommon discrimination.
After a hearty repast, relished with an appetite unknown to city epicures, they stretched themselves upon their couches of skins, and under the starry canopy of heaven, enjoyed the sound and sweet sleep of hardy and well-fed mountaineers.
Granted,' I replied, 'but a more humane, gentlemanly and amiable set of epicures do not probably exist in the Pacific.
Jones affirmed to be an admirable resemblance of a great favorite of the epicures in that country, which bore the title of “lake-fish,” and doubtless the assertion was true; for, although intended to answer the purposes of a weathercock, the fish was observed invariably to look with a longing eye in the direction of the beautiful sheet of water that lay imbedded in the mountains of Templeton.
I even went so far as to humor some of his less reprehensible propensities; and there were times when I found myself lauding his wicked jokes, as epicures do mustard, with tears in my eyes: -- so profoundly did it grieve me to hear his evil talk.
The least developed of all in Tarzan was the sense of taste, for he could eat luscious fruits, or raw flesh, long buried with almost equal appreciation; but in that he differed but slightly from more civilized epicures.