epicure


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Related to epicure: Epicurus

ep·i·cure

 (ĕp′ĭ-kyo͝or′)
n.
1. A person with refined taste, especially in food and wine.
2. A person devoted to sensuous pleasure and luxurious living.

[Middle English, an Epicurean, from Medieval Latin epicūrus, from Latin Epicūrus, Epicurus, from Greek Epikouros.]

epicure

(ˈɛpɪˌkjʊə)
n
1. a person who cultivates a discriminating palate for the enjoyment of good food and drink; gourmet
2. a person devoted to sensual pleasures
[C16: from Medieval Latin epicūrus, after Epicurus; see Epicurean]
ˈepicurˌism n

ep•i•cure

(ˈɛp ɪˌkyʊər)

n.
1. a person who cultivates a refined taste, esp. in food and wine; connoisseur.
2. Archaic. a person dedicated to sensual enjoyment.
[1555–65; < Latin Epicūrēus (see epicurean)]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.epicure - a person devoted to refined sensuous enjoyment (especially good food and drink)epicure - a person devoted to refined sensuous enjoyment (especially good food and drink)
sensualist - a person who enjoys sensuality

epicure

noun gourmet, foodie, glutton, epicurean, hedonist, gourmand, bon vivant (French), gastronome, sensualist, sybarite, voluptuary These delicacies will delight gastronomes and epicures.

epicure

noun
A person devoted to pleasure and luxury:
Translations

epicure

[ˈepɪkjʊəʳ] Ngastrónomo/a m/f

epicure

nFeinschmecker(in) m(f)

epicure

[ˈɛpɪkjʊəʳ] nbuongustaio/a
References in classic literature ?
Though her mode of doing everything was peculiarly meandering and circuitous, and without any sort of calculation as to time and place,--though her kitchen generally looked as if it had been arranged by a hurricane blowing through it, and she had about as many places for each cooking utensil as there were days in the year,--yet, if one would have patience to wait her own good time, up would come her dinner in perfect order, and in a style of preparation with which an epicure could find no fault.
I was an intellectual epicure, and wished to prolong the gratification of making this novel and piquant acquaintance: besides, I was for a while troubled with a haunting fear that if I handled the flower freely its bloom would fade--the sweet charm of freshness would leave it.
the friend of the cardinal, and the famous epicure whose grace after dinner used to be, `Good Lord, do me the favor to cause me to digest what I have eaten.
The hump meat afforded them a repast fit for an epicure.
But he thought it was very bad indeed, and his quarrel with Newman was that this unregulated epicure had a sadly insufficient perception of the bad.
He would have been seven times more Epicure, and atheist, than he was.
His daily living being very plain, he had a peculiar taste for sudden and isolated luxuries; he was an abstemious epicure.
They took with them the sumpter mules, which carried in panniers the wardrobe and table furniture of Sir Nigel; for the knight, though neither fop nor epicure, was very dainty in small matters, and loved, however bare the board or hard the life, that his napery should still be white and his spoon of silver.
There was one family in particular, that used to live about a mile from us--not straight down the road, but turning sharp off to the left by the turnpike where the Plymouth mail ran over the donkey--that were quite extraordinary people for giving the most extravagant parties, with artificial flowers and champagne, and variegated lamps, and, in short, every delicacy of eating and drinking that the most singular epicure could possibly require.
As an epicure snatches a taste of every dish which is successively brought to table, he not having allowed himself time to enjoy the one before, so have I gone from one subject to another without having discovered what I sought at first, the nature of justice.
Many exquisite viands might be rejected by the epicure, if it was a sufficient cause for his contemning of them as common and vulgar, that something was to be found in the most paltry alleys under the same name.
The casket of the skull is broken into with an axe, and the two plump, whitish lobes being withdrawn (precisely resembling two large puddings), they are then mixed with flour, and cooked into a most delectable mess, in flavor somewhat resembling calves' head, which is quite a dish among some epicures; and every one knows that some young bucks among the epicures, by continually dining upon calves' brains, by and by get to have a little brains of their own, so as to be able to tell a calf's head from their own heads; which, indeed, requires uncommon discrimination.