epideictic


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Related to epideictic: epideictic display

epideictic

(ˌɛpɪˈdaɪktɪk) or

epideictical

adj
(Rhetoric) designed to display something, esp the skill of the speaker in rhetoric. Also: epidictic
[C18: from Greek epideiktikos, from epideiknunai to display, show off, from deiknunai to show]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.epideictic - designed primarily for rhetorical display; "epideictic orations"
demonstrative - given to or marked by the open expression of emotion; "an affectionate and demonstrative family"
References in periodicals archive ?
If one of the main goals of epideictic rhetoric is to display the orator's talent, then that talent will be revealed more impressively if he acquits himself well on a challenging subject.
She wants us to understand how we have failed to understand that Indian epideictic is both pragmatic and inspirational at once, and that resulting limited perceptions about Indian epideictic have created a false impression that the rhetoric of praise and blame is mostly limited to the political podium, the pulpit, and to the graduate seminar parlor game.
With his characteristic passion for categorization, he distinguishes between and among what he calls the deliberative, the forensic, and the epideictic forms of rhetoric, each operating within a definable temporal sphere.
The speaker of epideictic rhetoric, who praises or commemorates his subject, generally speaks as a friend or as a spokesman for the larger group.
Renaissance academic medicine was both a scientific or technical profession and a humanistic discipline requiring skill in oratory and epideictic rhetoric.
The Distinguished Professor of Church History at Weston Jesuit School of Theology uses the epideictic style of Culture Three--the art of praise and blame--to examine all four.
I begin by discussing the purpose of an education in rhetoric before 1800--how it was almost exclusively grounded in speech and limited to the purposes of sermons, political diatribes, and epideictic orations.
It is clearly identified with the epideictic genre.
The epideictic genre describes ceremonial discourse, where the orator or writer is intent on pleasing or inspiring an audience; referring to the achievement of consensus in the present, it depends on appeals to shared values.
Monoson concludes, "Plato appropriates for philosophy at least part of the intellectual mission that the Athenians associated with the most celebrated--and uniquely democratic--form of epideictic, that is, funeral oratory" (205).
The emphasis is no longer on what's wrong, as it inevitably is in political rhetoric, but on positive examples that reinforce the building of character in the tradition of epideictic rhetoric and encomium that goes back to Plato and Plutarch.
The three genres of rhetoric, defined by Aristotle by their social contexts, included (1) epideictic rhetoric, a discourse of praise celebrating heroes and community values; (2) deliberative rhetoric, a discourse of advice designed to evaluate and determine the best course of action in cases of conflict and uncertainty; and (3) forensic rhetoric, which is judicial discourse used in accusing or defending those suspected of wrong-doing.