epidemic


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

ep·i·dem·ic

 (ĕp′ĭ-dĕm′ĭk) also ep·i·dem·i·cal (-ĭ-kəl)
adj.
1. Spreading rapidly and extensively by infection and affecting many individuals in an area or a population at the same time: an epidemic outbreak of influenza.
2. Widely prevalent: epidemic discontent.
n.
1. An outbreak of a contagious disease that spreads rapidly and widely.
2. A rapid spread, growth, or development: an unemployment epidemic.

[French épidémique, from épidémie, an epidemic, from Old French espydymie, from Medieval Latin epidēmia, from Greek epidēmiā, prevalence of an epidemic disease, from epidēmos, prevalent : epi-, epi- + dēmos, people; see dā- in Indo-European roots.]

ep′i·dem′i·cal·ly adv.

epidemic

(ˌɛpɪˈdɛmɪk)
adj
(Medicine) (esp of a disease) attacking or affecting many persons simultaneously in a community or area
n
1. (Medicine) a widespread occurrence of a disease: an influenza epidemic.
2. a rapid development, spread, or growth of something, esp something unpleasant: an epidemic of strikes.
[C17: from French épidémique, via Late Latin from Greek epidēmia literally: among the people, from epi- + dēmos people]
ˌepiˈdemically adv

ep•i•dem•ic

(ˌɛp ɪˈdɛm ɪk)

adj. Also, ep`i•dem′i•cal.
1. (of a disease) affecting many individuals at the same time, and spreading from person to person in a locality where the disease is not permanently prevalent.
2. extremely prevalent; widespread.
n.
3. a temporary prevalence of a disease.
4. a rapid spread or increase in the occurrence of something.
[1595–1605; obsolete epidem(y) (< Late Latin epidēmia < Greek epidēmía stay in one place, prevalence =epi- epi- + dêm(os) people of a district]
ep`i•dem′i•cal•ly, adv.
ep`i•de•mic′i•ty (-dəˈmɪs ɪ ti) n.

ep·i·dem·ic

(ĕp′ĭ-dĕm′ĭk)
An outbreak of a contagious disease that spreads rapidly and widely. See Note at endemic.

epidemic

a disease that is widely prevalent in a particular area. — epidemical, adj.epidemicity, n.
See also: Disease and Illness
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.epidemic - a widespread outbreak of an infectious disease; many people are infected at the same time
outbreak, irruption, eruption - a sudden violent spontaneous occurrence (usually of some undesirable condition); "the outbreak of hostilities"
pandemic - an epidemic that is geographically widespread; occurring throughout a region or even throughout the world
Adj.1.epidemic - (especially of medicine) of disease or anything resembling a disease; attacking or affecting many individuals in a community or a population simultaneously; "an epidemic outbreak of influenza"
medical specialty, medicine - the branches of medical science that deal with nonsurgical techniques
ecdemic - of or relating to a disease that originates outside the locality in which it occurs
endemic, endemical - of or relating to a disease (or anything resembling a disease) constantly present to greater or lesser extent in a particular locality; "diseases endemic to the tropics"; "endemic malaria"; "food shortages and starvation are endemic in certain parts of the world"

epidemic

noun
1. outbreak, plague, growth, spread, scourge, contagion A flu epidemic is sweeping through Britain.
2. spate, plague, outbreak, wave, rash, eruption, upsurge an epidemic of racist crimes
adjective
1. widespread, wide-ranging, general, sweeping, prevailing, rampant, prevalent, rife, pandemic The abuse of crack has reached epidemic proportions in the US in recent years.

epidemic

noun
A sudden increase in something, as the occurrence of a disease:
Translations
epidemieepidemický
epidemi
epidemia
epidemiakulkutaudinomainenkulkutautiepideeminen
epidemijaepidemijskipošast
járvány
faraldurfarsóttfarsótt, faraldur
流行病
유행병
epidemija
epidēmija
epidémia
epidemija
epidemi
การแพร่ระบาดอย่างรวดเร็ว
bệnh dịch

epidemic

[ˌepɪˈdemɪk]
A. ADJepidémico
B. Nepidemia f (fig) → ola f

epidemic

[ˌɛpɪˈdɛmɪk]
népidémie f
a flu epidemic → une épidémie de grippe
modif
to be of epidemic proportions [outbreak] → être de proportions épidémiques
to reach epidemic proportions [problem, disease] → atteindre des proportions épidémiques

epidemic

nEpidemie f (also fig), → Seuche f
adjepidemisch

epidemic

[ˌɛpɪˈdɛmɪk]
1. adjepidemico/a
2. nepidemia

epidemic

(epiˈdemik) noun
an outbreak of a disease that spreads rapidly and attacks very many people. an epidemic of measles/influenza.

epidemic

وَباء epidemie epidemi Epidemie επίδημία epidemia epidemia épidémie epidemija epidemia 流行病 유행병 epidemie epidemi epidemia epidemia эпидемия epidemi การแพร่ระบาดอย่างรวดเร็ว salgın bệnh dịch 流行

ep·i·dem·ic

n. epidemia, enfermedad que se manifiesta con alta frecuencia y que afecta a un número considerable de personas en una región o comunidad;
a. epidémico-a;
___ outbreakbrote ___;
___ growth factorfactor ___ de crecimiento.

epidemic

adj epidémico; n epidemia
References in classic literature ?
It turned out that the Jeroboam had a malignant epidemic on board, and that Mayhew, her captain, was fearful of infecting the Pequod's company.
In these crises there breaks out an epidemic that, in all earlier epochs, would have seemed an absurdity -- the epidemic of over-production.
This was the appearance of a dreadful epidemic, which, in that age and long before and afterwards, was wont to slay its hundreds and thousands on both sides of the Atlantic.
Those who died during this epidemic were buried in graves, after the manner of the whites, but without any regard to the direction of the head.
fever of 1805 = New York City had suffered a major epidemic of yellow fever in the summer of 1805; tambour-frame = a circular frame used to hold material being embroidered}
He was also re-vaccinated (from which we may assume that there had been another epidemic of smallpox at Lucknow) about the same time.
A serious epidemic broke out in the school and three of the boys died.
Gregory, let me recommend to your attention this singular epidemic among the sheep.
But about the middle of the winter Eady's horses fell ill of a local epidemic.
It was owing to the epidemic of chicken-pox in New York the winter Mrs.
The city, indeed, seemed abandoned to supreme neglect; it betrayed that indifference which seems epidemic to cities that are passing away.
Great crowds assembled, more especially in the dinner hour, in Madison Square about the Farragut monument, to listen to and cheer patriotic speeches, and a veritable epidemic of little flags and buttons swept through these great torrents of swiftly moving young people, who poured into New York of a morning by car and mono-rail and subway and train, to toil, and ebb home again between the hours of five and seven.