epigamic

Related to epigamic: unmeaningful

epigamic

(ˌɛpɪˈɡæmɪk)
adj
(Zoology) zoology attractive to the opposite sex: epigamic coloration.
References in periodicals archive ?
Activation followed by pheromone-oriented flight is the initial response of a receptive male in a chain of epigamic events leading to mating (Giebultowicz & Zdarek 1996).
In labroids, Robertson & Hoffman (1977) suggested that epigamic selection plays a much more important role than intra-sexual selection in the development of sexual dichromatism (though not for species possessing strictly haremic mating systems), and reasoned that despite being more costly to maintain than permanent dichromatism, natural selection would favor the development of ephemeral dichromatism in environments where continuous display of conspicuous signals would increase the risk of predation.
mirifica ephemeral sexual dichromatism may have evolved subjected to both epigamic and natural selections, leading to the development of a brief nuptial display that does not even persist during the actual mating/eggtransfer (which is particularly prolonged in this species) reducing predation exposure (Fig.
Epigamic selection by males as evidenced by courtship partner preferences in the checkered white butterfly (Pieris protodice).
Epigamic display in jumping spiders (Araneae, Salticidae) and its use in systematics.
Apart from the co-adapted lock and-key arrangements of external genitalia of conspecific females and males, one must try to analyse the role and formulae of pheromones that appear to function for specific sexual purposes either by contact (3) or remotely epigamic behaviour of mosquitoes including male swarming and inter-sexual communication by sight and specific sounds (4-6) as well as the cytogenetical and physiological systems.
It has been argued that epigamic structures and weapons of an organism should show higher levels of FA than the level found in non-sexual traits, because sexual selection is essentially directional.
The second, epigamic selection, assumes that members of one sex (usually females) choose members of the opposite sex for mating (Trivers, 1972; Lovich, 1996 and references therein).
The throat patch could have also resulted from epigamic selection (see Moller 1988a), as reported for other plumage traits (e.