epigram

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ep·i·gram

 (ĕp′ĭ-grăm′)
n.
1. A short, witty poem expressing a single thought or observation.
2. A concise, clever, often paradoxical statement.
3. Epigrammatic discourse or expression.

[Middle English, from Old French epigramme, from Latin epigramma, from Greek, from epigraphein, to mark the surface, inscribe : epi-, epi- + graphein, to write; see gerbh- in Indo-European roots.]

epigram

(ˈɛpɪˌɡræm)
n
1. a witty, often paradoxical remark, concisely expressed
2. (Poetry) a short, pungent, and often satirical poem, esp one having a witty and ingenious ending
[C15: from Latin epigramma, from Greek: inscription, from epigraphein to write upon, from graphein to write]
ˌepigramˈmatic, ˌepigramˈmatical adj
ˌepigramˈmatically adv

ep•i•gram

(ˈɛp ɪˌgræm)

n.
1. a witty, ingenious, or pointed saying tersely expressed.
2. epigrammatic expression: a genius for epigram.
3. a short, concise poem, often satirical, displaying a witty or ingenious turn of thought.
[1400–50; late Middle English < Latin epigramma < Greek epígramma inscription, epigram. See epi-, -gram1]

epigram

a pithy statement, often containing a paradox. — epigrammatist, n.
See also: Proverbs
a pithy statement, often containing a paradox.
See also: Language

epigram

A brief but memorable statement making a pithy observation.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.epigram - a witty saying
locution, saying, expression - a word or phrase that particular people use in particular situations; "pardon the expression"

epigram

noun witticism, quip, aphorism, bon mot, witty saying, witty poem Oscar Wilde was famous for his epigrams.
Quotations
"A thing well said will be wit in all languages" [John Dryden Essay of Dramatic Poesy]
Translations
epigram
epigramma
epigramma

epigram

[ˈepɪgræm] Nepigrama m

epigram

[ˈɛpɪgræm] népigramme m

epigram

n (= saying)Epigramm nt, → Sinngedicht nt

epigram

[ˈɛpɪˌgræm] nepigramma m
References in periodicals archive ?
In 1872, the prolific scholar Thomas Wright published The Anglo-Latin Satirical Poets and Epigrammatists of the Twelfth Century within the Rerum Britannicarum Medii Aevi Scriptores or "Rolls Series," an important nationalist project exemplifying the Victorian preoccupation with England's medieval past.
327-44), reminds us how Martial seldom mentions specific Greek epigrammatists in his poems in contrast to Latin precedessors like Catullus, Marsus, Pedo and Gaetulicus (cf.
Unlike Pliny or the epigrammatists, the Erotes presents specific viewing epiphanies that are constrained or limited by the access the temple setting allows.
CENTURIES from now, should our ancestors sort through the ephemeral artworks that rubbished the last century and, moreover, should they observe how even the truly lasting works seemed disproportionately obsessed by the ephemera and detritus of our culture (The Waste Land syndrome), they may wonder: Was there any poet who examined our world--regarding its weaknesses, imperfections, and evils--and fashioned the kind of permanent statements that the lyricists of the English sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, of the Italian thirteenth century, or the epigrammatists of Classical Rome, crafted out of and for their own?
94) Thus in two different ways, these two epigrammatists create fireworks that explode different domains with different results, except for one; laughter is the common product of their work.
In "The Comic and the Obscene in the Latin Epigrams of the Early Fifteenth Century," Donatella Coppini focuses on Panormita's Hermaphroditus as a groundbreaking generic model whose brand of comic obscenity carried over into the next several generations of Neo-Latin epigrammatists.
In rereading Don Quixote, the reader is struck less by the Don Quixote-Sancho Panza duality, so beloved to Kafka, Borges, and other epigrammatists of Cervantes' epic tragedy, as by Don Quixote's solitude, his mental and spiritual hunger, the incommensurability of his soulful longing with his environs, his resistance to repetition, his fear of reproduction, his love for creative mimesis (always at variance with the original), and his hatred for banality.
and which was so much too common amongst the Roman women, at the time when all morality was lost, that it was more than once the subject for the epigrammatists and satirists of that age.
A brief examination of his fellow epigrammatists in the Anthology provides a part of the literary context and a body of similar poetry against which to gauge Palladas's work.