epitaph


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ep·i·taph

 (ĕp′ĭ-tăf′)
n.
1. An inscription on a tombstone in memory of the one buried there.
2. A brief literary piece commemorating a deceased person.

[Middle English, from Old French epitaphe, from Latin epitaphium, from Greek epitaphion, from neuter of epitaphios, funerary : epi-, epi- + taphos, tomb.]

ep′i·taph′ic adj.

epitaph

(ˈɛpɪˌtɑːf; -ˌtæf)
n
1. a commemorative inscription on a tombstone or monument
2. a speech or written passage composed in commemoration of a dead person
3. a final judgment on a person or thing
[C14: via Latin from Greek epitaphion, from epitaphios over a tomb, from epi- + taphos tomb]
epitaphic adj
ˈepiˌtaphist n

ep•i•taph

(ˈɛp ɪˌtæf, -ˌtɑf)

n.
1. a commemorative inscription on a tomb or mortuary monument about the person buried at that site.
2. a brief composition in commemoration or praise of a deceased person.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Latin epitaphium < Greek epitáphion, n. use of neuter of epitáphios over or at a tomb]
ep`i•taph′ic (-ˈtæf ɪk) adj.

epitaph

- From Greek epi, "upon, over," and taphos, "tomb" or "funeral."
See also related terms for tomb.

epitaph

1. an inscription on a monument, as on a gravestone.
2. a short piece of prose or verse written in honor of a dead person. — epitaphial, epitaphian, epitaphic, adj.
See also: Death

epitaph

A eulogy commemorating the dead.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.epitaph - an inscription on a tombstone or monument in memory of the person buried thereepitaph - an inscription on a tombstone or monument in memory of the person buried there
inscription, lettering - letters inscribed (especially words engraved or carved) on something
2.epitaph - a summary statement of commemoration for a dead person
memorial, remembrance, commemoration - a recognition of meritorious service

epitaph

noun commemoration, inscription, elegy, engraving, obituary His words are carved as his epitaph on the headstone of his grave.
Translations
كِتابَه على ضَريح
gravskrift
sírfelirat
epitaphio
grafskrift; eftirmæli
エピタフ
epitafija
epitāfija, kapa uzraksts
epitafium
epitaf

epitaph

[ˈepɪtɑːf] Nepitafio m

epitaph

[ˈɛpɪtɑːf] népitaphe f

epitaph

nEpitaph nt; (on grave also) → Grabinschrift f

epitaph

[ˈɛpɪtɑːf] nepitaffio

epitaph

(ˈepitaːf) noun
something written or said about a dead person, especially something written on a tombstone.
References in classic literature ?
The Story Girl had brought flowers for her mother's grave as usual, and while she arranged them on it the rest of us read for the hundredth time the epitaph on Great-Grandfather King's tombstone, which had been composed by Great-Grandmother King.
Trefusis objected that the epitaph was untrue, and said that he did not see why tombstones should be privileged to publish false statements.
The captain was now interred, and might, perhaps, have already made a large progress towards oblivion, had not the friendship of Mr Allworthy taken care to preserve his memory, by the following epitaph, which was written by a man of as great genius as integrity, and one who perfectly well knew the captain.
He `died of desperate wounds received in gallant action' -- so reads his epitaph.
as his epitaph says, found himself later on, at the famous siege of Turin, in 1640, between Prince Thomas of Savoy, whom he was besieging, and the Marquis de Leganez, who was blockading him.
And this was the epitaph of a dead dog on the Northland trail--less scant than the epitaph of many another dog, of many a man.
But he, who would henceforth be dead to his native land, would have no epitaph save scornful and vindictive words.
Punch, it may be remarked, seemed to be pointing with the tip of his cap to a most flourishing epitaph, and to be chuckling over it with all his heart.
Now Xanthus and Gorgus, son of Midas the king, heard his epics and invited him to compose a epitaph for the tomb of their father on which was a bronze figure of a maiden bewailing the death of Midas.
I wish my epitaph may tell the truth about me if the man did not answer up at once, and say he would go and borrow a board as soon as he had lit the pipe which he was filling.
They closed the grave with a heavy stone until a slab was ready which Ambrosio said he meant to have prepared, with an epitaph which was to be to this effect:
I take no interest in creeping round dim and chilly churches behind wheezy old men, and reading epitaphs.