epitaph


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ep·i·taph

 (ĕp′ĭ-tăf′)
n.
1. An inscription on a tombstone in memory of the one buried there.
2. A brief literary piece commemorating a deceased person.

[Middle English, from Old French epitaphe, from Latin epitaphium, from Greek epitaphion, from neuter of epitaphios, funerary : epi-, epi- + taphos, tomb.]

ep′i·taph′ic adj.

epitaph

(ˈɛpɪˌtɑːf; -ˌtæf)
n
1. a commemorative inscription on a tombstone or monument
2. a speech or written passage composed in commemoration of a dead person
3. a final judgment on a person or thing
[C14: via Latin from Greek epitaphion, from epitaphios over a tomb, from epi- + taphos tomb]
epitaphic adj
ˈepiˌtaphist n

ep•i•taph

(ˈɛp ɪˌtæf, -ˌtɑf)

n.
1. a commemorative inscription on a tomb or mortuary monument about the person buried at that site.
2. a brief composition in commemoration or praise of a deceased person.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Latin epitaphium < Greek epitáphion, n. use of neuter of epitáphios over or at a tomb]
ep`i•taph′ic (-ˈtæf ɪk) adj.

epitaph

- From Greek epi, "upon, over," and taphos, "tomb" or "funeral."
See also related terms for tomb.

epitaph

1. an inscription on a monument, as on a gravestone.
2. a short piece of prose or verse written in honor of a dead person. — epitaphial, epitaphian, epitaphic, adj.
See also: Death

epitaph

A eulogy commemorating the dead.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.epitaph - an inscription on a tombstone or monument in memory of the person buried thereepitaph - an inscription on a tombstone or monument in memory of the person buried there
inscription, lettering - letters inscribed (especially words engraved or carved) on something
2.epitaph - a summary statement of commemoration for a dead person
memorial, remembrance, commemoration - a recognition of meritorious service

epitaph

noun commemoration, inscription, elegy, engraving, obituary His words are carved as his epitaph on the headstone of his grave.
Translations
كِتابَه على ضَريح
gravskrift
sírfelirat
epitaphio
grafskrift; eftirmæli
エピタフ
epitafija
epitāfija, kapa uzraksts
epitafium
epitaf

epitaph

[ˈepɪtɑːf] Nepitafio m

epitaph

[ˈɛpɪtɑːf] népitaphe f

epitaph

nEpitaph nt; (on grave also) → Grabinschrift f

epitaph

[ˈɛpɪtɑːf] nepitaffio

epitaph

(ˈepitaːf) noun
something written or said about a dead person, especially something written on a tombstone.
References in classic literature ?
Laurie dug a grave under the ferns in the grove, little Pip was laid in, with many tears by his tender-hearted mistress, and covered with moss, while a wreath of violets and chickweed was hung on the stone which bore his epitaph, composed by Jo while she struggled with the dinner.
I wish my epitaph may tell the truth about me if the man did not answer up at once, and say he would go and borrow a board as soon as he had lit the pipe which he was filling.
do me justice on my tombstone; dash me off, in one masterly sentence, on my epitaph.
I saw the idea suddenly break upon him that he would adapt his epitaph to the occasion, before he went on to say) "And there weren't no objection on your part, and Pip it were the great wish of your heart
Trefusis objected that the epitaph was untrue, and said that he did not see why tombstones should be privileged to publish false statements.
They closed the grave with a heavy stone until a slab was ready which Ambrosio said he meant to have prepared, with an epitaph which was to be to this effect:
But he, who would henceforth be dead to his native land, would have no epitaph save scornful and vindictive words.
exiled from his country, driven from his palaces, the orphan at once of his father and his throne, and deprived of everything, even of the melancholy happiness of kissing on his knees the stone upon which the hands of his murderers have written that simple epitaph which will eternally cry out for vengeance upon them: -- `Here lies Charles I.
Then, with a sudden dart of irony, he wondered if, when their turn came, the same epitaph would be written over him and Zeena.
By that her eye was instantly caught and long retained; and the perusal of the highly strained epitaph, in which every virtue was ascribed to her by the inconsolable husband, who must have been in some way or other her destroyer, affected her even to tears.
The epitaph of Sir Jenkin Grout is not wholly unintelligible to the present age: "Here lies Sir Jenkin Grout, who loved his friend and persuaded his enemy: what his mouth ate, his hand paid for: what his servants robbed, he restored: if a woman gave him pleasure, he supported her in pain: he never forgot his children; and whoso touched his finger, drew after it his whole body.
Some of these faubourgs were important: there were, first, starting from la Tournelle, the Bourg Saint-Victor, with its one arch bridge over the Bièvre, its abbey where one could read the epitaph of Louis le Gros,