epithet


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ep·i·thet

 (ĕp′ə-thĕt′)
n.
1.
a. A term used to characterize a person or thing, such as rosy-fingered in rosy-fingered dawn or the Great in Catherine the Great.
b. A term used as a descriptive substitute for the name or title of a person, such as The Great Emancipator for Abraham Lincoln.
2. A disparaging or abusive word or phrase.
3. Biology A word in the scientific name of an organism following the name of the genus and denoting a species, subspecies, variety, or cultivar, as sativa in Lactuca sativa.

[Latin epitheton, from Greek, neuter of epithetos, added, attributed, from epitithenai, epithe-, to add to : epi-, epi- + tithenai, to place; see dhē- in Indo-European roots.]

ep′i·thet′ic, ep′i·thet′i·cal adj.

epithet

(ˈɛpɪˌθɛt)
n
a descriptive word or phrase added to or substituted for a person's name: "Lackland" is an epithet for King John.
[C16: from Latin epitheton, from Greek, from epitithenai to add, from tithenai to put]
ˌepiˈthetic, ˌepiˈthetical adj

ep•i•thet

(ˈɛp əˌθɛt)

n.
1. a characterizing word or phrase added to or used in place of the name of a person or thing.
2. a word, phrase, or expression used invectively as a term of abuse or contempt.
[1570–80; < Latin epitheton epithet, adjective < Greek epítheton epithet, something added]
ep`i•thet′ic, ep`i•thet′i•cal, adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.epithet - a defamatory or abusive word or phrase
calumniation, calumny, defamation, hatchet job, traducement, obloquy - a false accusation of an offense or a malicious misrepresentation of someone's words or actions
smear word - an epithet that can be used to smear someone's reputation; "he used the smear word `communist' for everyone who disagreed with him"
2.epithet - descriptive word or phrase
characterisation, characterization, delineation, depiction, word picture, word-painting, picture - a graphic or vivid verbal description; "too often the narrative was interrupted by long word pictures"; "the author gives a depressing picture of life in Poland"; "the pamphlet contained brief characterizations of famous Vermonters"

epithet

noun
1. name, title, description, tag, nickname, designation, appellation, sobriquet, moniker or monicker (slang) players who fitted their manager's epithet of `headless chickens'
2. curse, obscenity, blasphemy, swear word, imprecation a stream of obscene epithets

epithet

noun
1. The word or words by which one is called and identified:
Slang: handle, moniker.
2. A profane or obscene term:
Informal: cuss.
Translations
epithetonscheldnaamschimpnaamtoenaam
epitet

epithet

[ˈepɪθet] Nepíteto m

epithet

[ˈɛpɪθɛt] népithète f

epithet

nBeiname m, → Epitheton nt (geh); (= insulting name)Schimpfname m

epithet

[ˈɛpɪθɛt] nepiteto
References in classic literature ?
pure, gentle, amiable, every epithet you may wish to apply, that indicates nothing but acquired excellence: but as to natural feelings, she is as cold as an icicle--in short she is destitute of HEART--the thing of all others I most prize in a woman, and for which I admire you so much.
I don't know; but if they do, I believe he merits the epithet.
He invariably met her criticisms with a good-natured grin and a flippant remark with some tender epithet tagged on to it.
Beautiful is an epithet often used in Scripture, and always mentioned with honour.
Thus they denote the folly of a servant, an omission of a child, a stone that cuts their feet, a continuance of foul or unseasonable weather, and the like, by adding to each the epithet of YAHOO.
We speak of what is white as large, because the surface over which the white extends is large; we speak of an action or a process as lengthy, because the time covered is long; these things cannot in their own right claim the quantitative epithet.
He was accustomed to say that Papists required an epithet, they were Roman Catholic; but the Church of England was Catholic in the best, the fullest, and the noblest sense of the term.
Napoleon apparently remembered seeing him on the battlefield and, addressing him, again used the epithet "young man" that was connected in his memory with Prince Andrew.
You see, I use the epithet 'my friend' because at a time like this all Frenchmen must forget their differences and work together for the good and honour of their country.
The epithet is very appropriate, for there is something truly divine in being able to argue as you have done for the superiority of injustice, and remaining unconvinced by your own arguments.
I went into a cafe to -- and while it was being mixed I asked the man who grabs up your hot Scotch spoon as soon as you lay it down what he undcrstood by the term, epithet, description, designation, characterisation or appellation, viz.
the Clerk of Copmanhurst, for so I am termed in these parts They add, it is true, the epithet holy, but I stand not upon that, as being unworthy of such addition.