epithet


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Related to epithet: specific epithet, Transferred epithet

ep·i·thet

 (ĕp′ə-thĕt′)
n.
1.
a. A term used to characterize a person or thing, such as rosy-fingered in rosy-fingered dawn or the Great in Catherine the Great.
b. A term used as a descriptive substitute for the name or title of a person, such as The Great Emancipator for Abraham Lincoln.
2. A disparaging or abusive word or phrase.
3. Biology A word in the scientific name of an organism following the name of the genus and denoting a species, subspecies, variety, or cultivar, as sativa in Lactuca sativa.

[Latin epitheton, from Greek, neuter of epithetos, added, attributed, from epitithenai, epithe-, to add to : epi-, epi- + tithenai, to place; see dhē- in Indo-European roots.]

ep′i·thet′ic, ep′i·thet′i·cal adj.

epithet

(ˈɛpɪˌθɛt)
n
a descriptive word or phrase added to or substituted for a person's name: "Lackland" is an epithet for King John.
[C16: from Latin epitheton, from Greek, from epitithenai to add, from tithenai to put]
ˌepiˈthetic, ˌepiˈthetical adj

ep•i•thet

(ˈɛp əˌθɛt)

n.
1. a characterizing word or phrase added to or used in place of the name of a person or thing.
2. a word, phrase, or expression used invectively as a term of abuse or contempt.
[1570–80; < Latin epitheton epithet, adjective < Greek epítheton epithet, something added]
ep`i•thet′ic, ep`i•thet′i•cal, adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.epithet - a defamatory or abusive word or phrase
calumniation, calumny, defamation, hatchet job, traducement, obloquy - a false accusation of an offense or a malicious misrepresentation of someone's words or actions
smear word - an epithet that can be used to smear someone's reputation; "he used the smear word `communist' for everyone who disagreed with him"
2.epithet - descriptive word or phrase
characterisation, characterization, delineation, depiction, word picture, word-painting, picture - a graphic or vivid verbal description; "too often the narrative was interrupted by long word pictures"; "the author gives a depressing picture of life in Poland"; "the pamphlet contained brief characterizations of famous Vermonters"

epithet

noun
1. name, title, description, tag, nickname, designation, appellation, sobriquet, moniker or monicker (slang) players who fitted their manager's epithet of `headless chickens'
2. curse, obscenity, blasphemy, swear word, imprecation a stream of obscene epithets

epithet

noun
1. The word or words by which one is called and identified:
Slang: handle, moniker.
2. A profane or obscene term:
Informal: cuss.
Translations
epithetonscheldnaamschimpnaamtoenaam
epitet

epithet

[ˈepɪθet] Nepíteto m

epithet

[ˈɛpɪθɛt] népithète f

epithet

nBeiname m, → Epitheton nt (geh); (= insulting name)Schimpfname m

epithet

[ˈɛpɪθɛt] nepiteto
References in classic literature ?
In spite of the fact that nobody ever mentioned his article to him after it appeared--full of typographical errors which he thought intentional-- he got a certain satisfaction from believing that the citizens of Lincoln had meekly accepted the epithet `coarse barbarians.
I see that my neighbor, who bears the familiar epithet William or Edwin, takes it off with his jacket.
Harris believed our boy had been loading him up with misinformation; and this was probably the case, for his epithet described that boy to a dot.
It had been many a day now since she had ventured a caress or a fondling epithet in his quarter.
Too often she betrayed this, by the undue vent she gave to a spiteful antipathy she had conceived against little Adele: pushing her away with some contumelious epithet if she happened to approach her; sometimes ordering her from the room, and always treating her with coldness and acrimony.
And you, you worthless - ' he broke out as I entered, turning to his daughter-in-law, and employing an epithet as harmless as duck, or sheep, but generally represented by a dash - .
Creakle, 'does you honour, certainly - I am surprised, Steerforth, I must say, that you should attach such an epithet to any person employed and paid in Salem House, sir.
Nay, I can tell you more,'' said Wamba, in the same tone; ``there is old Alderman Ox continues to hold his Saxon epithet, while he is under the charge of serfs and bondsmen such as thou, but becomes Beef, a fiery French gallant, when he arrives before the worshipful jaws that are destined to consume him.
He did so, and pensively apostrophized it with a shocking epithet in anticipation of the time when its appetite must be satisfied from the provision shop instead of from its mother's breast.
Thus they denote the folly of a servant, an omission of a child, a stone that cuts their feet, a continuance of foul or unseasonable weather, and the like, by adding to each the epithet of YAHOO.
any poet who should have listened to our talk, for heaven knows how many stages beyond Montargis, would have reaped a harvest of flaming epithet, rapturous description, and very tender confidences.
Passepartout was on the point of vigorously resenting the epithet, the reason of which he could not for the life of him comprehend; but he reflected that the unfortunate Fix was probably very much disappointed and humiliated in his self-esteem, after having so awkwardly followed a false scent around the world, and refrained.