epoch


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ep·och

 (ĕp′ək, ē′pŏk′)
n.
1. A particular period of history, especially one considered remarkable or noteworthy.
2. A unit of geologic time that is a division of a period.
3. Astronomy An instant in time that is arbitrarily selected as a point of reference for specification of celestial coordinates.

[Medieval Latin epocha, measure of time, from Greek epokhē, a point in time; see segh- in Indo-European roots.]

epoch

(ˈiːpɒk)
n
1. a point in time beginning a new or distinctive period: the invention of nuclear weapons marked an epoch in the history of warfare.
2. a long period of time marked by some predominant or typical characteristic; era
3. (Astronomy) astronomy a precise date to which information, such as coordinates, relating to a celestial body is referred
4. (Palaeontology) geology a unit of geological time within a period during which a series of rocks is formed: the Pleistocene epoch.
5. (General Physics) physics the displacement of an oscillating or vibrating body at zero time
[C17: from New Latin epocha, from Greek epokhē cessation; related to ekhein to hold, have]
epochal adj
ˈepˌochally adv

ep•och

(ˈɛp ək; esp. Brit. ˈi pɒk)

n.
1. a period of time marked by distinctive features, noteworthy events, changed conditions, etc.: an epoch of peace.
2. the beginning of a distinctive period in the history of anything.
3. a point of time distinguished by a particular event or state of affairs; a memorable date.
4. any of several divisions of a geologic period during which a geologic series is formed.
5. an arbitrarily fixed instant of time used as a reference in giving the elements of the orbit of a celestial body.
[1605–15; < New Latin epocha < Greek epochḗ pause, check, fixed point in time]

ep·och

(ĕp′ək, ē′pŏk′)
The shortest division of geologic time, being a subdivision of a period.

epoch

- Pronounced EH-puhk, it is from Greek epokhe, "fixed point in time, stoppage," and it was first the initial point in a chronology from which succeeding years were numbered.
See also related terms for stoppage.

epoch

A time unit within a geological period.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.epoch - a period marked by distinctive character or reckoned from a fixed point or eventepoch - a period marked by distinctive character or reckoned from a fixed point or event
period, period of time, time period - an amount of time; "a time period of 30 years"; "hastened the period of time of his recovery"; "Picasso's blue period"
day - an era of existence or influence; "in the day of the dinosaurs"; "in the days of the Roman Empire"; "in the days of sailing ships"; "he was a successful pianist in his day"
historic period, age - an era of history having some distinctive feature; "we live in a litigious age"
modern era - the present or recent times
2.epoch - (astronomy) an arbitrarily fixed date that is the point in time relative to which information (as coordinates of a celestial body) is recorded
astronomy, uranology - the branch of physics that studies celestial bodies and the universe as a whole
date - the particular day, month, or year (usually according to the Gregorian calendar) that an event occurred; "he tried to memorizes all the dates for his history class"
3.epoch - a unit of geological time that is a subdivision of a period and is itself divided into ages
geologic time, geological time - the time of the physical formation and development of the earth (especially prior to human history)
geological period, period - a unit of geological time during which a system of rocks formed; "ganoid fishes swarmed during the earlier geological periods"

epoch

noun era, time, age, period, date, aeon the beginning of a major epoch in world history

epoch

noun
A particular time notable for its distinctive characteristics:
age, day, era, period, time (often used in plural).
Translations
عَصْر
epoke
aikakausiajanjaksoepookkikäännekohta
tímamót
epocha
laikmets

epoch

[ˈiːpɒk] Népoca f
to mark an epochhacer época, marcar un hito

epoch

[ˈiːpɒk] népoque f, ère f

epoch

nZeitalter nt (also Geol), → Epoche f

epoch

[ˈiːpɒk] n (period) → epoca, era

epoch

(ˈiːpok) , ((American) ˈepək) noun
(the start of) a particular period of history, development etc. The invention of printing marked an epoch in the history of education.
References in classic literature ?
With a brief sketch, therefore, of the circumstances amid which the foundation of the house was laid, and a rapid glimpse at its quaint exterior, as it grew black in the prevalent east wind,--pointing, too, here and there, at some spot of more verdant mossiness on its roof and walls,--we shall commence the real action of our tale at an epoch not very remote from the present day.
For upwards of twenty years before this epoch, the independent position of the Collector had kept the Salem Custom-House out of the whirlpool of political vicissitude, which makes the tenure of office generally so fragile.
Yes, the Old Masters often drew badly; they did not care much for truth and exactness in minor details; but after all, in spite of bad drawing, bad perspective, bad proportions, and a choice of subjects which no longer appeal to people as strongly as they did three hundred years ago, there is a SOMETHING about their pictures which is divine--a something which is above and beyond the art of any epoch since--a something which would be the despair of artists but that they never hope or expect to attain it, and therefore do not worry about it.
Burch asked her to "lead in prayer" marked an epoch in her life.
Covey's course toward me form an epoch in my humble history.
It was the best of times, it was the worst of times, it was the age of wisdom, it was the age of foolishness, it was the epoch of belief, it was the epoch of incredulity, it was the season of Light, it was the season of Darkness, it was the spring of hope, it was the winter of despair, we had everything before us, we had nothing before us, we were all going direct to Heaven, we were all going direct the other way--in short, the period was so far like the present period, that some of its noisiest authorities insisted on its being received, for good or for evil, in the superlative degree of comparison only.
She recalled the small details, the words, tones, and looks, in the critical scenes which had opened a new epoch for her by giving her a deeper insight into the relations and trials of life, or which had called on her for some little effort of forbearance, or of painful adherence to an imagined or real duty-- asking herself continually whether she had been in any respect blamable.
The fifteenth century was the unhappy epoch of military establishments in the time of peace.
Our epoch, the epoch of the bourgeoisie, possesses, however, this distinctive feature: it has simplified the class antagonisms: Society as a whole is more and more splitting up into two great hostile camps, into two great classes, directly facing each other: Bourgeoisie and Proletariat.
At an epoch when, as Monsieur de Valois said, Woman no longer existed, she was simply "Madame du Val-Noble"; in other days she would have rivalled the Rhodopes, the Imperias, the Ninons of the past.
He did not wear the uniform cloak--which was not obligatory at that epoch of less liberty but more independence--but a cerulean-blue doublet, a little faded and worn, and over this a magnificent baldric, worked in gold, which shone like water ripples in the sun.
Then he added, "Monsieur, you may rest assured I shall perform my duty impartially, and that if he be innocent you shall not have appealed to me in vain; should he, however, be guilty, in this present epoch, impunity would furnish a dangerous example, and I must do my duty.