epyllion

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epyllion

(ɪˈpɪlɪən)
n, pl -lia (-lɪə)
(Literary & Literary Critical Terms) a miniature epic
[C19: from Greek, diminutive of epos]
References in periodicals archive ?
2) Later, when discussing Virgil's reception in Renaissance literature, Smith identifies obvious candidates such as Sannazaro and Vida, but omits another important Renaissance poet, Baptista Mantuanus, who composed his own Eclogues and Christian epyllia, the Parthenices, in imitation of Virgil.
But these genre-related topoi do not prevent Shakespeare from exploring lyrical elements in drama and dramatic components in non-dramatic modes such as his two epyllia and his sonnets.
12) The subjects are, despite Apollo's warning to the contrary at the opening of the sixth poem, more 'epic' and grander than what one would usually expect from poets in a pastoral landscape: the fourth poem prophecies the dawn of a new Golden Age, while the largest part of the sixth Eclogue consists of a conglomerate of epyllia relating the mythic history of the world.
But touched by the history of epyllia and knowing what we know of Marvell the man, it is all the more enriching to read "The Unfortunate Lover" as a homoerotic paean, even if it is ultimately violent and besmirches the cherished memory of our favorite (after Milton) Interregnum poet.
Shakespeare] was effectively writing for a readership no different in essence from that of his sonnets and epyllia," and that "Shakespeare had readers in mind too, however much practical theatrical applications must also have shaped his thoughts.
48) Does the trail traced by the epyllia of the 1590s and early 1600s also constitute a knowing, perhaps coded, affirmation of the homoerotic?
Carew's poem, like the murals in the Palazzo del Te and those in Bolsover's Elysium, found its ultimate source in the erotic poetry of Ovid; but it derived more immediately from the seduction poems of Donne (especially the Donne of "The Ecstasy" and the "Elegy: To his Mistress Going to Bed"), and the erotic epyllia of the 1590s - poems that frequently featured banquets of sense as instigators of a delicious state of sensual ravishment (the most striking of these is Chapman's Ovids Banquet of Sence).
While remaining true to the pastoral mode as he had promised at the opening of the poem, he was able to diversify his medium with a wide range of themes normally associated with other genres of poetry, epyllia ("short epics") of mythological content and lyric poetry included.
In this context Spenser and Cervantes, rather than Marlowe or Jonson, become models for comparison, while the epyllia provide a means of access to the strategies adopted in the plays.
The approach serves to align the plays not with the early histories, often used as a point of reference because of their structure, but with Titus Andronicus and the epyllia, discussed in an 'interchapter' between The Taming of the Shrew and The Comedy of Errors.
Pythagorean re-incarnation is scarcely an idea Ovid could resist in his philosophically inflected, concatenated epyllia of transformations, where we may also trace Stoic, Heraclitean, Empedoclean, Anaxagorean as well as Epicurean vestiges.