equal-area

e·qual-ar·e·a

(ē′kwəl-âr′ē-ə)
adj.
Relating to or being a map projection in which areas on the map are proportional to corresponding areas on a globe.

equal-area

n
(Physical Geography) (modifier) (of a map projection) showing area accurately and therefore distorting shape and direction. Also: homolographic
References in periodicals archive ?
Because the data obtained from soil archives were collected based on soil horizons, equal-area quadratic splines were fitted to the horizon data (Bishop et al.
In order to challenge assumptions about power and dominance, an entire wall is dedicated to the largest Hobo-Dyer equal-area map ever produced.
In contrast, most cartographers value the equal-area property, as the comparison of a real extents is made easier.
An equal-area world map is the usual template for incidence and endemicity displays, whereas regional maps and insets are used as needed; however, no section or entry on geographically diverse, health care-associated bacterial infections is included.
SAFE, Equal-area partitions of sphere, presentation at UNSW, July 2003.
The coordinates of the TAZ polygons are converted into the Albers Equal-Area (AEA) Conic Projection.
has long supported and distributed the equal-area Peters Projection World Map because of its fairness to all people, showing each country in its true size and proportion.
The Air Movement and Control Association (AMCA) and American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-conditioning Engineering (ASHRAE) outline a procedure "taking equal-area traverse" involving two dozen readings for the round section of a fan.
With the exception of five world-view Mollweide equal-area oval projection maps, all the modern maps have a scale that is expressed in miles and kilometers, or sometimes yards and meters.
And mathematicians haven't yet proved that the hexagonal honeycomb is the most efficient way of partitioning a region into equal-area units (SN: 3/5/94, p.
Various equal-area map projections have been developed for right triangles (Snyder 1992; van Leeuwen and Strebe 2006), and a diamond can be subdivided into spherical right triangles in a number of ways.
Mollweide (muhl-VIDE-uh): This is an equal-area projection, which means the sizes of the continents are shown in correct relationship to each other.