equanimity


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e·qua·nim·i·ty

 (ē′kwə-nĭm′ĭ-tē, ĕk′wə-)
n.
The quality of being calm and even-tempered; composure.

[Latin aequanimitās, from aequanimus, even-tempered, impartial : aequus, even + animus, mind; see anə- in Indo-European roots.]

equanimity

(ˌiːkwəˈnɪmɪtɪ; ˌɛkwə-)
n
calmness of mind or temper; composure
[C17: from Latin aequanimitās, from aequus even, equal + animus mind, spirit]
equanimous adj
eˈquanimously adv

e•qua•nim•i•ty

(ˌi kwəˈnɪm ɪ ti, ˌɛk wə-)

n.
composure, esp. under tension or strain; evenness of temper.
[1600–10; < Latin aequanimitās=aequ(us) (see equal) + anim(us) mind, spirit, feelings + -itās -ity]

equanimity

calmness of temperament; even-temperedness. — equanimous, adj.
See also: Attitudes
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.equanimity - steadiness of mind under stress; "he accepted their problems with composure and she with equanimity"
disposition, temperament - your usual mood; "he has a happy disposition"
aplomb, assuredness, sang-froid, cool, poise - great coolness and composure under strain; "keep your cool"
serenity, tranquility, placidity, tranquillity, repose, quiet - a disposition free from stress or emotion

equanimity

equanimity

noun
Translations

equanimity

[ˌekwəˈnɪmɪtɪ] Necuanimidad f

equanimity

[ˌɛkwəˈnɪməti] négalité f d'humeur
with equanimity → avec sérénité

equanimity

nGleichmut m, → Gelassenheit f; with equanimitygleichmütig, gelassen; to recover one’s equanimityseine Gelassenheit wiedergewinnen, das seelische Gleichgewicht wiederfinden

equanimity

[ˌɛkwəˈnɪmɪtɪ] nequanimità, serenità d'animo

equanimity

n. ecuanimidad; entereza.
References in classic literature ?
Their own remoteness and elevation above its feverish life kept them from the knowledge of much that was strange, and perhaps disturbing to their equanimity.
Look now at Stubb; a man who from his humorous, deliberate coolness and equanimity in the direst emergencies, was specially qualified to excel in pitchpoling.
He would listen to the most pathetic appeals with the most discouraging politeness and equanimity.
Altogether existence grew brighter, and when she was left alone with the teacher for her grammar lesson she had nearly recovered her equanimity, which was more than Miss Dearborn had.
The little party recovered its equanimity at sight of the fragrant feast.
We have to slay pride in giants, envy by generosity and nobleness of heart, anger by calmness of demeanour and equanimity, gluttony and sloth by the spareness of our diet and the length of our vigils, lust and lewdness by the loyalty we preserve to those whom we have made the mistresses of our thoughts, indolence by traversing the world in all directions seeking opportunities of making ourselves, besides Christians, famous knights.
This is so clear a proposition, that moderation itself can scarcely listen to the railings which have been so copiously vented against this part of the plan, without emotions that disturb its equanimity.
Now that he was fully convinced, Fix had quite recovered his equanimity.
The laborers began to jeer the travelers and by their insolence disturbed the equanimity even of the cool Athos, who urged on his horse against one of them.
To be brief, she was that wisest, but unloveliest, variety of woman, a philosopher, bearing troubles of the heart with equanimity, dispensing with all that should have been her happiness, and making the best of what remained.
Indeed, she has not yet recovered her equanimity on the subject, though it is now nearly three hours since dinner, and the house-floor is perfectly clean again; as clean as everything else in that wonderful house- place, where the only chance of collecting a few grains of dust would be to climb on the salt-coffer, and put your finger on the high mantel-shelf on which the glittering brass candlesticks are enjoying their summer sinecure; for at this time of year, of course, every one goes to bed while it is yet light, or at least light enough to discern the outline of objects after you have bruised your shins against them.
Close to where we lay, squatting upon their haunches, were some eight or ten noble-looking chiefs--for such they subsequently proved to be--who, more reserved than the rest, regarded us with a fixed and stern attention, which not a little discomposed our equanimity.