equator


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equator

e·qua·tor

 (ĭ-kwā′tər)
n.
1.
a. The imaginary great circle around the earth's surface, equidistant from the poles and perpendicular to the earth's axis of rotation. It divides the earth into the Northern Hemisphere and the Southern Hemisphere.
b. A similar great circle drawn on the surface of a celestial body at right angles to the axis of rotation.
2. The celestial equator.
3. A circle that divides a sphere or other surface into congruent parts.

[Middle English, from Medieval Latin aequātor (diēī et noctis), equalizer (of day and night), from Latin aequāre, to equalize; see equate.]

equator

(ɪˈkweɪtə)
n
1. (Physical Geography) the great circle of the earth with a latitude of 0°, lying equidistant from the poles; dividing the N and S hemispheres
2. (Mathematics) a circle dividing a sphere or other surface into two equal symmetrical parts
3. (General Physics) See magnetic equator
4. (Astronomy) astronomy See celestial equator
[C14: from Medieval Latin (circulus) aequātor (diei et noctis) (circle) that equalizes (the day and night), from Latin aequāre to make equal]

e•qua•tor

(ɪˈkweɪ tər)

n.
1. the great circle on a sphere or heavenly body whose plane is perpendicular to the axis and everywhere equidistant from the poles.
2. the great circle of the earth that is equidistant from the North Pole and South Pole.
3. a circle separating a surface into two congruent parts.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Medieval Latin aequātor, Latin: equalizer (of day and night, as when the sun crosses the equator). See equate, -tor]
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equator

e·qua·tor

(ĭ-kwā′tər)
1. The imaginary line forming a great circle around the Earth's surface halfway between the North and South poles. It divides the Earth into the Northern Hemisphere and the Southern Hemisphere.
2. A similar circle on the surface of any celestial body.

Equator

See also earth; geography

two points on the surface of the earth diametrically opposite each other. — antipodean, n. , adj.
persons living on opposite sides of the equator but in the same longitude whose shadows at noon fall in opposite directions.

equator

An imaginary line around the Earth midway between the poles.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.equator - an imaginary line around the Earth forming the great circle that is equidistant from the north and south polesequator - an imaginary line around the Earth forming the great circle that is equidistant from the north and south poles; "the equator is the boundary between the northern and southern hemispheres"
great circle - a circular line on the surface of a sphere formed by intersecting it with a plane passing through the center
2.equator - a circle dividing a sphere or other surface into two usually equal and symmetrical parts
circle - ellipse in which the two axes are of equal length; a plane curve generated by one point moving at a constant distance from a fixed point; "he calculated the circumference of the circle"
Translations
خَط الإسْتِواءخَطُّ الِاسْتِواء
rovník
ækvator
päiväntasaaja
ekvator
egyenlítõ
miîbaugur
赤道
적도
ekvatorinisekvatoriuspusiaujaspusiaujo
ekvators
rovník
ekvator
ekvator
เส้นศูนย์สูตร
đường xích đạo

equator

[ɪˈkweɪtəʳ] Necuador m

equator

[ɪˈkweɪtər] n
the equator → l'Équateur m

equator

nÄquator m; at the equatoram Äquator

equator

[ɪˈkweɪtəʳ] n the equatorl'equatore m

equator

(iˈkweitə) noun
(with the) an imaginary line (or one drawn on a map etc) passing round the globe, at an equal distance from the North and South poles. Singapore is almost on the equator.
equatorial (ekwəˈtoːriəl) adjective
of or near the equator. an equatorial climate.

equator

خَطُّ الِاسْتِواء rovník ækvator Äquator ισημερινός ecuador päiväntasaaja équateur ekvator Equatore 赤道 적도 evenaar ekvator równik equador экватор ekvator เส้นศูนย์สูตร ekvator đường xích đạo 赤道

e·qua·tor

n. ecuador, línea imaginaria que divide un cuerpo en dos partes iguales.
References in classic literature ?
The tick escaped from Tom, presently, and crossed the equator.
When they got near to the Equator they saw some flying-fishes coming towards them.
Now night, in the forests of the equator, is always dangerous, particularly when, like ourselves, one has not the materials for a fire to keep off the beasts of prey.
He went to the Gallapagos, a horrid dry place on the Equator, where he was nearly baked to death; he went to the Georgia Islands, the Orkneys, Emerald Island, Little Nightingale Island, Gough's Island, Bouvet's Island, the Crossets, and even to a little speck of an island south of the Cape of Good Hope.
The 20th of July, the tropic of Capricorn was cut by 105d of longitude, and the 27th of the same month we crossed the Equator on the 110th meridian.
An island situated on the other side of the equator, at least two thousand leagues from here," replied the count.
Even in the constitutional realm of Trade Winds, north and south of the equator, ships are overtaken by strange disturbances.
The circumstances amid which he had left Tess were such that though, while on the south of the Equator and just in receipt of her loving epistle, it had seemed the easiest thing in the world to rush back into her arms the moment he chose to forgive her, now that he had arrived it was not so easy as it had seemed.
That it was far south of the equator was evident from the constellations, but I was not sufficiently a Martian astronomer to come much closer than a rough guess without the splendid charts and delicate instruments with which, as an officer in the Heliumite Navy, I had formerly reckoned the positions of the vessels on which I sailed.
The change in vegetation below showed me that we were rapidly nearing the equator.
Between these extremes is the equator of life, of thought, of spirit, of poetry,--a narrow belt.
This island, lying near to the eastern coast of Africa, is in the sixth degree of south latitude, that is to say, four hundred and thirty geographical miles below the equator.