equilibrist


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e·quil·i·brist

 (ĭ-kwĭl′ə-brĭst)
n.
A person who performs feats of balance, such as tightrope walking.

[French équilibriste, from équilibre, equilibrium, from Latin aequilībrium; see equilibrium.]

e·quil′i·bris′tic adj.

equilibrist

(ɪˈkwɪlɪbrɪst)
n
(Professions) a person who performs balancing feats, esp on a high wire
eˌquiliˈbristic adj

e•quil•i•brist

(ɪˈkwɪl ə brɪst, ˌi kwəˈlɪb rɪst, ˌɛk wə-)

n.
a performer skilled at feats of balancing, as a tightrope walker.
[1750–60; < French]
e•quil`i•bris′tic, adj.

equilibrist

one who performs feats that require an unusual sense of balance, as a tightrope walker.
See also: Acrobatics, Performing
References in classic literature ?
That gentleman was a sort of Barnum, the director of a troupe of mountebanks, jugglers, clowns, acrobats, equilibrists, and gymnasts, who, according to the placard, was giving his last performances before leaving the Empire of the Sun for the States of the Union.
The performance was much like all acrobatic displays; but it must be confessed that the Japanese are the first equilibrists in the world.
The comic juggling group from Italy will perform in Dubai's malls featuring equilibrist performers and comedy animation.
Other performances such as 'Lord of the Fire' by pole equilibrist Roman Kronzhko and 'Heels Flight' done by a trapeze artist duo Evgeny Pisarev and Maria Syulgina, who also did an illusory act called 'Quick Change', were liked very much by the audience.
In this exhibition, there was the brilliant Hannah Ryggen, whose fearless antitotalitarian textiles mix experimentalism with ancient Norwegian craftsmanship; the equilibrist portraitist Laserstein; and Lohse-Wachtler, extraordinary for her emotionally charged, pathological renderings.
The most subtly witty picture in this exhibition is perhaps Portrait of an Equilibrist (Fig.
Within this equilibrist existence, external manifestations of behavior produced as a response to the scientifically based requirements demanded by candidates' teaching positions operate in tandem with a proportionate display of feeling and emotion in response to students with whom they relate.
Florian Zumkehr, a shaggy-haired swiss equilibrist, was memorable in an early chair-balancing section.
Described by a more sympathetic critic as 'ein Equilibrist zwischen Utopie and Narretei', (22) Hasler's Dunant is, like Emily Kempin, a victim of his own tirelessness as a crusader for change, and the presentation of his oscillation between charisma and extremity is the author's chief achievement in this work.
One track is his old fascination of exploring deeply intense glazing, with all possible variations of a strictly limited spectrum of colour and the other is his equilibrist search for perfection of a certain form.