equinox


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Related to equinox: September equinox
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equinox
celestial sphere showing the positions of the autumnal and vernal equinoxes

e·qui·nox

 (ē′kwə-nŏks′, ĕk′wə-)
n.
1. Either of two points on the celestial sphere at which the ecliptic intersects the celestial equator.
2. Either of the two times during a year when the sun crosses the celestial equator and when the length of day and night are approximately equal; the vernal equinox or the autumnal equinox.

[Middle English, from Old French equinoxe, from Medieval Latin aequinoxium, from Latin aequinoctium : aequi-, equi- + nox, noct-, night; see nekw-t- in Indo-European roots.]

equinox

(ˈiːkwɪˌnɒks; ˈɛkwɪˌnɒks)
n
1. (Astronomy) either of the two occasions, six months apart, when day and night are of equal length. See vernal equinox, autumnal equinox
2. (Astronomy) another name for equinoctial point
[C14: from Medieval Latin equinoxium, changed from Latin aequinoctium, from aequi- equi- + nox night]

e•qui•nox

(ˈi kwəˌnɒks, ˈɛk wə-)

n.
the time when the sun crosses the plane of the earth's equator, making night and day of approximately equal length all over the earth and occurring about March 21 (vernal equinox) and Sept. 22 (autumnal equinox).
[1350–1400; Middle English < Medieval Latin equinoxium, for Latin aequinoctium=aequi- equi- + noct-, s. of nox night + -ium -ium1]
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equinox
Changes in seasons occur as the position of the Earth in relation to the sun changes. Equinoxes and solstices mark the beginning of opposite seasons in the Northern and Southern Hemispheres. For example, the June solstice marks the beginning of summer in the Northern Hemisphere and of winter in the Southern Hemisphere. The September equinox marks the beginning of fall in the Northern Hemisphere and of spring in the Southern Hemisphere.

e·qui·nox

(ē′kwə-nŏks′)
1. Either of the two moments of the year when the sun crosses the celestial equator. The vernal equinox occurs on March 20 or 21, and the autumnal equinox occurs on September 22 or 23. The days on which an equinox falls have about equal periods of sunlight and darkness.
2. Either of the two points on the celestial sphere where the apparent path of the sun (known as the ecliptic) crosses the celestial equator. Compare solstice.

equinox

“Equal night,” the two points at which the ecliptic intersects the celestial equator to produce the seasonal spring (vernal) equinox and autumnal (fall) equinox.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.equinox - either of two times of the year when the sun crosses the plane of the earth's equator and day and night are of equal lengthequinox - either of two times of the year when the sun crosses the plane of the earth's equator and day and night are of equal length
cosmic time - the time covered by the physical formation and development of the universe
2.equinox - (astronomy) either of the two celestial points at which the celestial equator intersects the ecliptic
astronomy, uranology - the branch of physics that studies celestial bodies and the universe as a whole
celestial point - a point in the heavens (on the celestial sphere)
vernal equinox - (astronomy) the equinoctial point that lies in the constellation of Pisces
autumnal equinox - (astronomy) the equinoctial point that lies in the constellation of Virgo
Translations
الإعْتِدال الرَّبيعي أو الخَريفي
rovnodennost
jævndøgn
ekvinokso
päiväntasaus
napéjegyenlőség
jafndægur
equinoctium
ekvinokcija
ekvinokcija
rovnodennosť
dagjämning
gün-tün eşitliği

equinox

[ˈiːkwɪnɒks] Nequinoccio m

equinox

[ˈiːkwinɒks ˈɛkwinɒks] néquinoxe m spring equinox, autumn equinox

equinox

nTagundnachtgleiche f, → Äquinoktium nt; the spring/autumn equinoxdie Frühjahrs-/Herbst-Tagundnachtgleiche

equinox

[ˈiːkwɪnɒks] nequinozio

equinox

(ˈekwinoks) noun
the time when the sun crosses the equator, about March 21 and September 23.
References in classic literature ?
and but six months before he wheeled out of a former equinox at Aries
Every fourth year, at the vernal equinox, there is a representative council of the whole nation, which meets in a plain about twenty miles from our house, and continues about five or six days.
Since the September equinox it had emerged from the northern horizon, rising by lengthened spirals up to the 21st of December.
At a less advanced season of the year the typhoon, according to a famous meteorologist, would have passed away like a luminous cascade of electric flame; but in the winter equinox it was to be feared that it would burst upon them with great violence.
I think if we had had the disposal of events--if Mansfield Park had had the government of the winds just for a week or two, about the equinox, there would have been a difference.
No, monsieur, there were only these words: `Dear Porthos, set out, if you would wish to arrive before the Equinox.
He was a stern, gaunt man, with a harsh voice, and an aggressive manner, but he had the merit of knowing how to assimilate the ideas of other men, and to pass them on in a way which was intelligible and even interesting to the lay public, with a happy knack of being funny about the most unlikely objects, so that the precession of the Equinox or the formation of a vertebrate became a highly humorous process as treated by him.
The season meanwhile was drawing onward to the equinox, and though it was still fine, the days were much shorter.
His measures are the hours; morning and night, solstice and equinox, geometry, astronomy and all the lovely accidents of nature play through his mind.
The solstice he does not observe; the equinox he knows as little; and the whole bright calendar of the year is without a dial in his mind.
It was by my account the 30th of September, when, in the manner as above said, I first set foot upon this horrid island; when the sun, being to us in its autumnal equinox, was almost over my head; for I reckoned myself, by observation, to be in the latitude of nine degrees twenty-two minutes north of the line.
And now, for the last two days, the rains on this lower course of the river had been incessant, so that the old men had shaken their heads and talked of sixty years ago, when the same sort of weather, happening about the equinox, brought on the great floods, which swept the bridge away, and reduced the town to great misery.