equivocation


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Related to equivocation: amphiboly

e·quiv·o·ca·tion

 (ĭ-kwĭv′ə-kā′shən)
n.
1. The use of equivocal language.
2. An equivocal statement or expression.

equivocation

(ɪˌkwɪvəˈkeɪʃən)
n
1. the act or an instance of equivocating
2. (Logic) logic a fallacy based on the use of the same term in different senses, esp as the middle term of a syllogism, as the badger lives in the bank, and the bank is in the High Street, so the badger lives in the High Street
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.equivocation - a statement that is not literally false but that cleverly avoids an unpleasant truthequivocation - a statement that is not literally false but that cleverly avoids an unpleasant truth
deception, misrepresentation, deceit - a misleading falsehood
indirect expression, circumlocution - an indirect way of expressing something
doublespeak - any language that pretends to communicate but actually does not
hedging, hedge - an intentionally noncommittal or ambiguous statement; "when you say `maybe' you are just hedging"
cavil, quibble, quiddity - an evasion of the point of an argument by raising irrelevant distinctions or objections
2.equivocation - intentionally vague or ambiguous
equivocalness, ambiguity - unclearness by virtue of having more than one meaning
untruthfulness - the quality of being untruthful
3.equivocation - falsification by means of vague or ambiguous language
falsification, misrepresentation - a willful perversion of facts

equivocation

noun ambiguity, evasion, hedging, waffle (informal, chiefly Brit.), shuffling, quibbling, prevarication, weasel words (informal, chiefly U.S.), double talk, tergiversation, doubtfulness Why doesn't he just say what he thinks without equivocation?

equivocation

noun
1. The use or an instance of equivocal language:
Informal: waffle.
2. An expression or term liable to more than one interpretation:
Translations
équivocitééquivoque

equivocation

[ɪˌkwɪvəˈkeɪʃən] Nevasivas fpl

equivocation

[ɪˌkwɪvəˈkeɪʃən] néquivoque f

equivocation

nAusflucht f, → doppelsinnige or ausweichende Formulierung; without equivocationohne Ausflüchte

equivocation

[ɪˌkwɪvəˈkeɪʃn] nparole fpl equivoche
References in classic literature ?
asked Magua, without adverting in any manner to the former equivocation of the chief.
The disguise, equivocation, mystery, so hateful to her to practise, might soon be over.
Answer without equivocation,” continued the Judge sternly.
I am very miserable about Sir James Martin, and have no other way in the world of helping myself but by writing to you, for I am forbidden even speaking to my uncle and aunt on the subject; and this being the case, I am afraid my applying to you will appear no better than equivocation, and as if I attended to the letter and not the spirit of mamma's commands.
Besides, the notion of a city naturally precedes that of a family or an individual, for the whole must necessarily be prior to the parts, for if you take away the whole man, you cannot say a foot or a hand remains, unless by equivocation, as supposing a hand of stone to be made, but that would only be a dead one; but everything is understood to be this or that by its energic qualities and powers, so that when these no longer remain, neither can that be said to be the same, but something of the same name.
The quick vision that his life was after all a failure, that he was a dishonored man, and must quail before the glance of those towards whom he had habitually assumed the attitude of a reprover--that God had disowned him before men and left him unscreened to the triumphant scorn of those who were glad to have their hatred justified--the sense of utter futility in that equivocation with his conscience in dealing with the life of his accomplice, an equivocation which now turned venomously upon him with the full-grown fang of a discovered lie:-- all this rushed through him like the agony of terror which fails to kill, and leaves the ears still open to the returning wave of execration.
Parker, who officiated, remarked, when all was over, to a few particular friends, and with some equivocation, as it seems to me, that he 'buried her very willingly, and with much satisfaction.
I doubt whether I have not done wrong, even now; and today I will, without reserve or equivocation, disclose my real reasons to Mr Cherryble, and implore him to take immediate measures for removing this young lady to the shelter of some other roof.
This excellent method of conveying a falsehood with the heart only, without making the tongue guilty of an untruth, by the means of equivocation and imposture, hath quieted the conscience of many a notable deceiver; and yet, when we consider that it is Omniscience on which these endeavour to impose, it may possibly seem capable of affording only a very superficial comfort; and that this artful and refined distinction between communicating a lie, and telling one, is hardly worth the pains it costs them.
In this, however, Blifil was so well assisted by Western, that he succeeded without difficulty; for as Mr Allworthy had been assured by her father that Sophia had a proper affection for Blifil, and that all which he had suspected concerning Jones was entirely false, Blifil had nothing more to do than to confirm these assertions; which he did with such equivocations, that he preserved a salvo for his conscience; and had the satisfaction of conveying a lie to his uncle, without the guilt of telling one.
As for equivocations, or oraculous speeches, they cannot hold out long.
I will have no more of these equivocations," he replied.