era


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ERA

abbr.
1. earned run average
2. Equal Rights Amendment

e·ra

 (îr′ə, ĕr′ə)
n.
1. A period of time as reckoned from a specific date serving as the basis of its chronological system.
2. A period of time characterized by particular circumstances, events, or personages: the Colonial era of US history; the Reagan era.
3. The longest division of geologic time, made up of one or more periods.

[Late Latin aera, from Latin, counters, pl. of aes, aer-, bronze coin; see ayes- in Indo-European roots.]

era

(ˈɪərə)
n
1. a period of time considered as being of a distinctive character; epoch
2. an extended period of time the years of which are numbered from a fixed point or event: the Christian era.
3. a point in time, esp one beginning a new or distinctive period: the discovery of antibiotics marked an era in modern medicine.
4. (Palaeontology) geology a major division of geological time, divided into several periods: the Mesozoic era.
[C17: from Latin aera counters, plural of aes brass, pieces of brass money]

ERA

(ˈiːrə)
n acronym for
1. (Education) (in Britain) Education Reform Act: the 1988 act which established the key elements of the National Curriculum
2. (Sociology) (in the US) Equal Rights Amendment: a proposed amendment to the US Constitution enshrining equality between the sexes

e•ra

(ˈɪər ə, ˈɛr ə)

n., pl. e•ras.
1. a period of time marked by distinctive character, events, etc.
2. the period of time to which anything belongs or is to be assigned.
3. a system of chronologic notation reckoned from a given date.
4. a point of time from which succeeding years are numbered, as at the beginning of a system of chronology.
5. a date or an event forming the beginning of any distinctive period.
6. a major division of geologic time composed of a number of periods.
[1605–15; < Late Latin aera fixed date, era, probably identical with Latin aera counters, pl. of aes piece of metal, money]

ERA

1. Also, eraBaseball. earned run average.
2. Equal Rights Amendment.

e·ra

(îr′ə)
A division of geologic time, longer than a period and shorter than an eon.

era

A time unit within an eon. An era contains at least two periods.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.era - a period marked by distinctive character or reckoned from a fixed point or eventera - a period marked by distinctive character or reckoned from a fixed point or event
period, period of time, time period - an amount of time; "a time period of 30 years"; "hastened the period of time of his recovery"; "Picasso's blue period"
day - an era of existence or influence; "in the day of the dinosaurs"; "in the days of the Roman Empire"; "in the days of sailing ships"; "he was a successful pianist in his day"
historic period, age - an era of history having some distinctive feature; "we live in a litigious age"
modern era - the present or recent times
2.era - a major division of geological time; an era is usually divided into two or more periods
geologic time, geological time - the time of the physical formation and development of the earth (especially prior to human history)
eon, aeon - the longest division of geological time
geological period, period - a unit of geological time during which a system of rocks formed; "ganoid fishes swarmed during the earlier geological periods"
3.ERA - (baseball) a measure of a pitcher's effectiveness; calculated as the average number of earned runs allowed by the pitcher for every nine innings pitched
baseball, baseball game - a ball game played with a bat and ball between two teams of nine players; teams take turns at bat trying to score runs; "he played baseball in high school"; "there was a baseball game on every empty lot"; "there was a desire for National League ball in the area"; "play ball!"
criterion, standard, touchstone, measure - a basis for comparison; a reference point against which other things can be evaluated; "the schools comply with federal standards"; "they set the measure for all subsequent work"

era

noun age, time, period, stage, date, generation, cycle, epoch, aeon, day or days a custom pre-dating the Christian era

era

noun
A particular time notable for its distinctive characteristics:
age, day, epoch, period, time (often used in plural).
Translations
عَصْرعَهْد، فَتْرَه
èpocaeraperíode
æraepokeperiodetidsalder
ÄraErdzeitalterZeitalter
éra
erajamanmasaperiode
sögulegt tímabilsögulegt tímabil, tímar
aetas
era
ēralaikmets
epocăerăperioadă
era

era

[ˈɪərə] Nera f
to mark an erahacer época

era

[ˈɪərə] nère f, époque f
to be the end of an era → marquer la fin d'une époque
the post-war era → les années d'après-guerre

era

nÄra f, → Epoche f; (Geol) → Erdzeitalter nt; the Christian era(die) christliche Zeitrechnung; the end of an eradas Ende einer Ära

era

[ˈɪərə] nera

era

(ˈiərə) noun
1. a number of years counting from an important point in history. the Victorian era.
2. a period of time marked by an important event or events. an era of social reform.
References in classic literature ?
He had that sense, or inward prophecy, --which a young man had better never have been born than not to have, and a mature man had better die at once than utterly to relinquish,--that we are not doomed to creep on forever in the old bad way, but that, this very now, there are the harbingers abroad of a golden era, to be accomplished in his own lifetime.
Like all that pertains to crime, it seemed never to have known a youthful era.
To that mission its stern, inflexible, energetic elements, were well adapted; but, as a Christian, I look for another era to arise.
As he talked along, softly, pleasantly, flowingly, he seemed to drift away imperceptibly out of this world and time, and into some remote era and old forgotten country; and so he gradually wove such a spell about me that I seemed to move among the specters and shadows and dust and mold of a gray antiquity, holding speech with a relic of it
Luther's wedding-ring was shown me; also a fork belonging to a time anterior to our era, and an early bookjack.
Externals have a great effect on the young: I thought that a fairer era of life was beginning for me, one that was to have its flowers and pleasures, as well as its thorns and toils.
Cruncher himself always spoke of the year of our Lord as Anna Dominoes: apparently under the impression that the Christian era dated from the invention of a popular game, by a lady who had bestowed her name upon it.
This was bad enough; but, as the philosophic Dane observes, with that universal applicability which distinguishes the illustrious ornament of the Elizabethan Era, worse remains behind
I am conscious that I shall be found still more faulty in the tone of keeping and costume, by those who may be disposed rigidly to examine my Tale, with reference to the manners of the exact period in which my actors flourished: It may be, that I have introduced little which can positively be termed modern; but, on the other hand, it is extremely probable that I may have confused the manners of two or three centuries, and introduced, during the reign of Richard the First, circumstances appropriated to a period either considerably earlier, or a good deal later than that era.
And so today we pledge an end to the era of deadlock and drift, and a new season of American renewal has begun.
If there be any truth in the remark, the crisis at which we are arrived may with propriety be regarded as the era in which that decision is to be made; and a wrong election of the part we shall act may, in this view, deserve to be considered as the general misfortune of mankind.
The angles of a Square (and still more those of an equilateral Triangle), being much more pointed than those of a Pentagon, and the lines of inanimate objects (such as houses) being dimmer than the lines of Men and Women, it follows that there is no little danger lest the points of a square or triangular house residence might do serious injury to an inconsiderate or perhaps absent-minded traveller suddenly therefore, running against them: and as early as the eleventh century of our era, triangular houses were universally forbidden by Law, the only exceptions being fortifications, powder-magazines, barracks, and other state buildings, which it is not desirable that the general public should approach without circumspection.