eradicable


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e·rad·i·cate

 (ĭ-răd′ĭ-kāt′)
tr.v. e·rad·i·cat·ed, e·rad·i·cat·ing, e·rad·i·cates
1. To tear up by the roots: "They loosened the soil and eradicated the weeds" (James Macauley).
2. To get rid of; eliminate: Their goal was to eradicate poverty. See Synonyms at eliminate.

[Middle English eradicaten, from Latin ērādīcāre, ērādīcāt- : ē-, ex-, ex- + rādīx, rādīc-, root; see wrād- in Indo-European roots.]

e·rad′i·ca·ble (-kə-bəl) adj.
e·rad′i·ca′tion n.
e·rad′i·ca′tive adj.
e·rad′i·ca′tor n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.eradicable - able to be eradicated or rooted out
ineradicable - not able to be destroyed or rooted out; "ineradicable superstitions"
References in periodicals archive ?
117) To that end, the TAP lists eight standards by which to measure success; one such marker is whether or not "[p]riority small and isolated eradicable populations of feral pigs have been removed.
And there should be no let-up in the fight against an ignorant philosophy that deems such an eradicable disease as a necessary evil.
LF has been found one of the potentially eradicable diseases.
Although he knows that this "perfect state" cannot be attained because of man's eradicable pride, Voegelin continues, "This raises the question of the peculiar psychopathological condition in which a man like More must have found himself when he drew up the model of the perfect society in history, in full consciousness that it could never be realized because of original sin.
Hopkins is The Carter Center's Vice President for Health Programs and the chair of the International Task Force for Disease Eradication, housed at The Carter Center, helping identify potentially eradicable diseases.
That is, this friendship does not contain the pronounced inequality of friendships based in superiority, but neither is the disparity eradicable so long as they are thus eager to contend and strive for the noble.
NCC being a preventable and potentially eradicable disease, urgent interventions at community level are required to reduce the disease burden.
The notion of "zero poverty" expresses a conviction among development experts that extreme poverty, defined by the United Nations as subsistence on less than $1 a day, is eradicable.
Dandelions, docks and couch grass, are, the books will tell you, eradicable.