erosion


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Related to erosion: Wind erosion, soil erosion

e·ro·sion

 (ĭ-rō′zhən)
n.
1. The group of natural processes, including weathering, dissolution, abrasion, corrosion, and transportation, by which material is worn away from the earth's surface.
2. The superficial destruction of bodily tissue by friction, pressure, ulceration, or trauma.
3. The process of eroding or the condition of being eroded: erosion of confidence in the governor; erosion of the value of the dollar.

[Latin ērōsiō, ērōsiōn-, an eating away, from ērōsus, eaten away; see erose.]

e·ro′sion·al adj.
e·ro′sion·al·ly adv.

erosion

(ɪˈrəʊʒən)
n
1. (Geological Science) the wearing away of rocks and other deposits on the earth's surface by the action of water, ice, wind, etc
2. the act or process of eroding or the state of being eroded
eˈrosive, eˈrosional adj

e•ro•sion

(ɪˈroʊ ʒən)

n.
1. the act or process of eroding.
2. the state of being eroded.
3. the process by which the surface of the earth is worn away by the action of water, glaciers, winds, waves, etc.
[1535–45; < Latin ērōsiō. See erode, -tion]
e•ro′sion•al, adj.

e·ro·sion

(ĭ-rō′zhən)
The gradual wearing away of land surface materials, especially rocks, sediments, and soils, by the action of water, wind, or a glacier. Usually erosion also involves the transfer of eroded material from one place to another, as from the top of a mountain to an adjacent valley, or from the upstream portion of a river to the downstream portion.

erosion

The removal of loose mineral particles by wind, water, and moving ice.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.erosion - (geology) the mechanical process of wearing or grinding something down (as by particles washing over it)erosion - (geology) the mechanical process of wearing or grinding something down (as by particles washing over it)
geology - a science that deals with the history of the earth as recorded in rocks
chatter mark - marks on a glaciated rock caused by the movement of a glacier
ablation - the erosive process that reduces the size of glaciers
attrition, corrasion, detrition, abrasion - erosion by friction
beach erosion - the erosion of beaches
geologic process, geological process - (geology) a natural process whereby geological features are modified
deflation - (geology) the erosion of soil as a consequence of sand and dust and loose rocks being removed by the wind; "a constant deflation of the desert landscape"
planation - the process of erosion whereby a level surface is produced
soil erosion - the washing away of soil by the flow of water
2.erosion - condition in which the earth's surface is worn away by the action of water and wind
environmental condition - the state of the environment
3.erosion - a gradual decline of something; "after the accounting scandal there was an erosion of confidence in the auditors"
decline, diminution - change toward something smaller or lower
4.erosion - erosion by chemical action
chemical action, chemical change, chemical process - (chemistry) any process determined by the atomic and molecular composition and structure of the substances involved
pitting, indentation, roughness - the formation of small pits in a surface as a consequence of corrosion
rusting, rust - the formation of reddish-brown ferric oxides on iron by low-temperature oxidation in the presence of water

erosion

noun
1. disintegration, deterioration, corrosion, corrasion, wearing down or away, grinding down erosion of the river valleys
2. deterioration, wearing, undermining, destruction, consumption, weakening, spoiling, attrition, eating away, abrasion, grinding down, wearing down or away an erosion of moral standards
Translations
تأكُّل، تآكُل، تَعْرِيَه
eroze
erosionudhulning
eroosiokuluminensyöpyminen
erozija
erózió
veîrun, eyîing, uppblástur
erózia
aşın maerozyon

erosion

[ɪˈrəʊʒən] N
1. (Geol) → erosión f; [of metal] → corrosión f
2. (fig) → desgaste m

erosion

[ɪˈrəʊʒən] n
[soil, rock] → érosion f
[freedom, confidence] → érosion f

erosion

n (by water, glaciers, rivers) → Erosion f, → Abtragung f; (by acid) → Ätzung f; (fig, of love etc) → Schwinden nt; (of power, values, beliefs)Untergrabung f; (of authority)Unterminierung f; (of differentials)Aushöhlen nt; (of value)Abtragung f, → Untergrabung f; an erosion of confidence in the poundein Vertrauensverlust mor -schwund mdes Pfundes

erosion

[ɪˈrəʊʒn] n (see vb) → erosione f, corrosione f

erode

(iˈrəud) verb
to eat or wear away (metals etc); to destroy gradually. Acids erode certain metals; Water has eroded the rock; The individual's right to privacy is being eroded.
eˈrosion (-ʒən) noun

e·ro·sion

n. erosión, desgaste.

erosion

n erosión f
References in classic literature ?
An area, as large perhaps as Sussex, has been lifted up en bloc with all its living contents, and cut off by perpendicular precipices of a hardness which defies erosion from all the rest of the continent.
At the far end I could see that erosion from above had washed down sufficient rubble to form a narrow ribbon of beach.
It was the erosion from this hillside, he judged, that had formed the little level stretch of vegetable garden.
Possibly because of some fault that had occurred when the knolls were flung together, and certainly helped by freakish erosion, the hole had been scooped out in the course of centuries by the wash of water.
He's always draining and ditching to stop erosion, and experimenting with pasture grasses.
Facing erosion and stream sedimentation problems from vineyards and rangelands similar to those in California, researchers in Spain, including Cerdà (1997), have been interested in California rainfall simulator research.
In Brief: ARS is about to release an updated Universal Soil Loss Equation that incorporates more intricate combinations of observation-and process-based science to produce the most accurate soil erosion estimates yet.
One of the most important methods in keeping such water resources is the correct management for decreasing erosion and produced sediment whoese requisite is being aware of the amount of sedimentation in the upper basin of the dams.
THE Welsh Government has launched a strategy to manage coastal erosion, just a week after 13 caravans were left hanging over the edge of a cliff by a rock fall.
Dental erosion has been defined as progressive irreversible loss of hard dental tissues by a chemical process not involving bacteria [WHO, 2003].
It's also facing a potential change in the way it acquires funds for a key responsibility: restoring beach areas damaged by development, storms and natural erosion.
MULTAN -- The Shujabad Canal Division has sent proposals to the Punjab government for repairing and maintenance of 16 infrastructures damaged due to erosion during flood.