erotesis

erotesis

a manner of phrasing a question that presupposes an answer that is either a strong affirmative or, more often, a strong negative.
See also: Rhetoric and Rhetorical Devices
References in periodicals archive ?
Erotesis y lepsis no son descripciones de las formulas diversas del lenguaje mediante las cuales se expresan los tipos de proposiciones inferenciales dialecticas, sino senalamientos sobre la naturaleza cognitiva diferenciada que la misma clase de [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII], la que es [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII], tiene para quienes la utilizan en momentos inferenciales diferentes de una misma actividad o proceso dialectico (85).
Hart (4) (1569): Distinction or pointing comma marke of the parenthesis interrogative Mulcaster (1582): Distinction comma interrogation parenthesis Clement (1587): Distinction and pointings of sentences comma interrogation parenthesis Coote (1596): Points or states in writing comma interrogation parenthesis Daines (5) (1640): Stops, points or pauses comma interrogation parenthesis point Hodges (1644): Points or stops comma interrogation -- point Hodges (1653): Points or stops comma interrogation parenthesis point Wharton 1654: Points comma erotesis parenthesis Adis (1660?
Typically, a rhetorical question is asked not to elicit information but to express emotion, as with erotesis (implying strong affirmation or denial) and epiplexis (to chastise).
What is a limit for Plato here is also one for his reader, since the brevity of the erotesis limits the confidence with which conclusions can be drawn about the voice of Meletus.
8) What is unusual about Socrates' opening to the erotesis.
9) Together these titles imbricate eros and erotesis, and while Trollope may never be accused of the "hyperoxysophistical paradoxology" with which Peacock satirizes Coleridge, he is more than a little interested in the "collocations of words" with which courtships are conducted.
3)"I do not say that no figure of thought is to be found in Antiphon; for there are certainly erotesis and paraleipsis and other such things in his speeches.
EROTESIS (EROTEMA): a rhetorical question implying strong affirmation or denial:
In the following example, note also the foregrounded anaphora and the erotesis with which Stowe ends the passage: