eroticism


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Related to eroticism: erotism, erratic, exoticism

e·rot·i·cism

 (ĭ-rŏt′ĭ-sĭz′əm)
n.
The quality of being erotic or being represented as erotic.

e·rot′i·cist n.

eroticism

(ɪˈrɒtɪˌsɪzəm) or

erotism

n
1. erotic quality or nature
2. the use of sexually arousing or pleasing symbolism in literature or art
3. sexual excitement or desire
4. a tendency to exalt sex
5. psychol an overt display of sexual behaviour

e•rot•i•cism

(ɪˈrɒt əˌsɪz əm)

also er•o•tism

(ˈɛr əˌtɪz əm)

n.
1. sexual or erotic quality or character.
2. the use of erotic symbolism, themes, etc., as in art or literature.
3. the condition of being sexually aroused.
4. sexual drive or tendency.
[1880–85]
e•rot′i•cist, n.

eroticism

1. the erotic or sexual quality of something.
2. the use of sexually arousing or stimulating materials in literature, drama, art, etc.
3. the condition of being sexually stimulated.
4. a sexual drive or tendency.
5. an abnormally persistent sexual drive. Also erotism.
See also: Sex
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.eroticism - a state of anticipation of sexuality
sexual arousal - the arousal of sexual desires in preparation for sexual behavior
2.eroticism - the arousal of feelings of sexual desireeroticism - the arousal of feelings of sexual desire
concupiscence, physical attraction, sexual desire, eros - a desire for sexual intimacy
carnality, lasciviousness, lubricity, prurience, pruriency - feeling morbid sexual desire or a propensity to lewdness

eroticism

noun
Translations

eroticism

[ɪˈrɒtɪsɪzəm] Nerotismo m

eroticism

[ɪˈrɒtɪsɪzəm] nérotisme m

eroticism

nErotik f

eroticism

[ɪˈrɒtɪˌsɪzm] nerotismo
References in classic literature ?
This has ever been the fate of energy in security; it takes to art and to eroticism, and then come languor and decay.
Karen Kilimnik's dreamy ruminations on the fairy-tale worlds of the Russian ballet or the exotic "ultra-Englishness" of The Avengers are part of the background here (and so, in turn, must be the spirit of Kilimnik's great precursor Joseph Cornell), but Teplin's paint handling is compulsive and overloaded, transmitting not the indolent eroticism of the Rococo but the hectic fantasies of the Symbolists.
And this due to, not in spite of, its eroticism of women whose ages and sizes would disqualify them from such consideration in Hollywood - or, for that matter, in Indian, European or Asian cinema.
Her mysteriousness suggests both the allure of a mermaid and the eroticism of the faun; indeed, she strikes several poses from Nijinsky's L'Apres-midi d'un Faune.
And even Sherman's later work, which has developed a gloss of its own, sticks to a play of personas and an utterly enigmatic sense of self that still seem distant from Mapplethorpe's declarative portraiture, showy eroticism, and chromatic and thematic polarities of profound black and brilliant white.
It's about the female body and the idea of what eroticism is all about for women," she says.
Whitelock, "A Garden of Desire, A Meadow of Decay: Masculine Identity Crisis in Marvell's Mower Poems"; Goran Stanivukovic, "'The blushing shame of souldiers': The Eroticism of Heroic Masculinity in John Fletcher's Bonduca"; Lisa Hopkins, "'A place privileged to do men wrong': The Anxious Masculinity of The Maid's Tragedy"; Taylor Corse, "Manliness and Misogy ny in Dryden's Aeneid"; Andrew P.
In comparison to John Neumeier's 1977 version, Baldwin's movement vocabulary remains more static and ceremonial, and the stiff Egyptian style in which the figures dance somehow neutralizes the eroticism of the story.
But rather than a grand eroticism as weighty as the "death premise," Lins's idiosyncratic work uncovers a sensuality, a whimsical surrealism that facilitates a synthesis of form and content while preserving the terms of Minimalism's material confrontation with the viewer.
The main difference is that the gay love scenes are depicted lovingly, and with convincing eroticism.
Entertainment can't get much more sexual than direct representations of sex, much more erotic than scenes of blatant eroticism.
These two books examine eroticism in seventeenth-century literature and art in quite different ways.