err

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Related to erred: Presidence, dwindling, compelling, wore, erred on the side of caution, berated

err

 (ĕr, ûr)
intr.v. erred, err·ing, errs
1. To make an error or misjudgment: I erred in turning onto the dead-end street.
2. To commit an act that is wrong; do wrong.
3. Archaic To stray.

[Middle English erren, from Old French errer, from Latin errāre, to wander; see ers- in Indo-European roots.]

err

(ɜː)
vb (intr)
1. to make a mistake; be incorrect
2. to stray from the right course or accepted standards; sin
3. to act with bias, esp favourable bias: to err on the side of justice.
[C14: erren to wander, stray, from Old French errer, from Latin errāre]

err

(ɜr, ɛr)

v.i.
1. to go astray in thought or belief; be mistaken or incorrect.
2. to go astray morally; sin.
3. Archaic. to deviate from the true course or purpose.
[1275–1325; Middle English < Old French errer < Latin errāre; akin to Old High German irrōn, Gothic airzjan]
err`a•bil′i•ty, n.
err′a•ble, adj.

err


Past participle: erred
Gerund: erring

Imperative
err
err
Present
I err
you err
he/she/it errs
we err
you err
they err
Preterite
I erred
you erred
he/she/it erred
we erred
you erred
they erred
Present Continuous
I am erring
you are erring
he/she/it is erring
we are erring
you are erring
they are erring
Present Perfect
I have erred
you have erred
he/she/it has erred
we have erred
you have erred
they have erred
Past Continuous
I was erring
you were erring
he/she/it was erring
we were erring
you were erring
they were erring
Past Perfect
I had erred
you had erred
he/she/it had erred
we had erred
you had erred
they had erred
Future
I will err
you will err
he/she/it will err
we will err
you will err
they will err
Future Perfect
I will have erred
you will have erred
he/she/it will have erred
we will have erred
you will have erred
they will have erred
Future Continuous
I will be erring
you will be erring
he/she/it will be erring
we will be erring
you will be erring
they will be erring
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been erring
you have been erring
he/she/it has been erring
we have been erring
you have been erring
they have been erring
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been erring
you will have been erring
he/she/it will have been erring
we will have been erring
you will have been erring
they will have been erring
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been erring
you had been erring
he/she/it had been erring
we had been erring
you had been erring
they had been erring
Conditional
I would err
you would err
he/she/it would err
we would err
you would err
they would err
Past Conditional
I would have erred
you would have erred
he/she/it would have erred
we would have erred
you would have erred
they would have erred
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.err - to make a mistake or be incorrecterr - to make a mistake or be incorrect  
misremember - remember incorrectly; "I misremembered the date"
slip up, trip up, stumble - make an error; "She slipped up and revealed the name"
misjudge - judge incorrectly
fall for - be deceived, duped, or entrapped by; "He fell for her charms"; "He fell for the con man's story"
2.err - wander from a direct course or at random; "The child strayed from the path and her parents lost sight of her"; "don't drift from the set course"
go, locomote, move, travel - change location; move, travel, or proceed, also metaphorically; "How fast does your new car go?"; "We travelled from Rome to Naples by bus"; "The policemen went from door to door looking for the suspect"; "The soldiers moved towards the city in an attempt to take it before night fell"; "news travelled fast"
rove, stray, roam, vagabond, wander, swan, ramble, range, drift, tramp, cast, roll - move about aimlessly or without any destination, often in search of food or employment; "The gypsies roamed the woods"; "roving vagabonds"; "the wandering Jew"; "The cattle roam across the prairie"; "the laborers drift from one town to the next"; "They rolled from town to town"

err

verb
1. make a mistake, mistake, go wrong, blunder, slip up (informal), misjudge, be incorrect, be inaccurate, miscalculate, go astray, be in error, put your foot in it (informal), misapprehend, blot your copybook (informal), drop a brick or clanger (informal) The contractors seriously erred in their original estimates.
2. sin, fall, offend, lapse, trespass, do wrong, deviate, misbehave, go astray, transgress, be out of order, blot your copybook (informal) If he errs again, he will be severely punished.
Quotations
"To err is human, to forgive divine" [Alexander Pope An Essay on Criticism]

err

verb
1. To make an error or mistake:
2. To violate a moral or divine law:
3. Archaic. To turn away from a prescribed course of action or conduct:
Translations
يُخْطِئ
chybovatmýlit
begå fejlfejle
téved
skjátlast, hafa rangt fyrir sér
klystiklysti ką nors darant
kļūdīties
hata yapmakyanılmak

err

[ɜːʳ] VI (= be mistaken) → equivocarse; (= sin) → pecar
to err on the side of mercy/cautionpecar de piadoso/cauteloso
to err is humanerrar es de humanos, quien tiene boca se equivoca

err

[ˈɜːr] vi
(= make mistakes) → se tromper
to err is human → l'erreur est humaine
to err on the side of caution → pécher par excès de prudence
(= be unfaithful) [husband, lover] → commettre une faute

err

vi
(= be mistaken)sich irren; to err in one’s judgementin seinem Urteil fehlgehen, sich in seinem Urteil irren; to err is human(, to forgive divine) (Prov) → Irren ist menschlich(, Vergeben göttlich) (Prov); it is better to err on the side of cautionman sollte im Zweifelsfall lieber zu vorsichtig sein
(Rel, = stray) → abgehen, in die Irre gehen

err

[ɜːʳ] vi (be mistaken) → sbagliare, errare; (sin) → peccare
it is better to err on the side of caution → la prudenza non è mai troppa

err

(əː) verb
to make a mistake; to be wrong; to do wrong.
err on the side of
to be guilty of what might be seen as a fault in order to avoid an opposite and greater fault. It is better to err on the side of leniency when punishing a child .
References in classic literature ?
He is apparently conscious of having erred, in too energetically pressing his deeds of loving-kindness on persons unable to appreciate them.
I have erred against every common-place notion of decorum; I have been open and sincere where I ought to have been reserved, spiritless, dull, and deceitful--had I talked only of the weather and the roads, and had I spoken only once in ten minutes, this reproach would have been spared.
Men and women die; philosophers falter in wisdom, and Christians in goodness: if any one you know has suffered and erred, let him look higher than his equals for strength to amend and solace to heal.
Could it be hurtful to send for some one - some minister of any denomination, it does not matter which - to explain it, and show you how very far you have erred from its precepts; and how unfit you will be for its heaven, unless a change takes place before you die?
In this speech the Sheriff erred, for the King asked quickly,
If they erred most in the structure of the Union, this was the work most difficult to be executed; this is the work which has been new modelled by the act of your convention, and it is that act on which you are now to deliberate and to decide.
All this very plausible reasoning does not convince me, as it has not convinced the wisest of our Statesmen, that our ancestors erred in laying it down as an axiom of policy that the toleration of Irregularity is incompatible with the safety of the State.
Not meeting any sufficient response, he went on, "Is it possible that I have erred in my supposition?
Therefore, the duke erred in his choice, and it was the cause of his ultimate ruin.
Silently the Queen had listened, but now, rising and placing her hand on little Violet's head, she said, turning to the throng below:-- "We in our pride and power have erred, while this, the weakest and lowliest of our subjects, has from the innocence of her own pure heart counselled us more wisely than the noblest of our train.
I will not dispute the fact that I have erred most grievously--that I should never dare to dispute, or that I have fallen greatly in my own estimation; but, I think I was fated from birth so to do--and one cannot escape fate, my beloved.
If he erred at all, it was by so painful a degree of self-distrust, that even the mildest censure would lead him to consider an indifferent action as a crime.