erudite


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Related to erudite: candor, amity, abnegation

er·u·dite

 (ĕr′yə-dīt′, ĕr′ə-)
adj.
Having or showing great knowledge or learning. See Synonyms at learned.

[Middle English erudit, from Latin ērudītus, past participle of ērudīre, to instruct : ē-, ex-, ex- + rudis, rough, untaught; see rude.]

er′u·dite′ly adv.

erudite

(ˈɛrʊˌdaɪt)
adj
having or showing extensive scholarship; learned
[C15: from Latin ērudītus, from ērudīre to polish, from ex-1 + rudis unpolished, rough]
ˈeruˌditely adv
erudition, ˈeruˌditeness n

er•u•dite

(ˈɛr yʊˌdaɪt, ˈɛr ʊ-)

adj.
characterized by great erudition; learned or scholarly.
[1375–1425; late Middle English < Latin ērudītus learned, orig. past participle of ērudīre to instruct =ē- e- + -rudīre, derivative of rudis rough, rude]
er′u•dite`ly, adv.
er′u•dite`ness, n.

erudite

- Meaning "having or showing knowledge," it traces to Latin eruditus/erudire, "bring out of an untrained state," with the base being rudis, "untrained; rude."
See also related terms for rude.

erudite

Having or involving great scholarship or learning.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.erudite - having or showing profound knowledge; "a learned jurist"; "an erudite professor"
scholarly - characteristic of scholars or scholarship; "scholarly pursuits"; "a scholarly treatise"; "a scholarly attitude"

erudite

erudite

adjective
Having or showing profound knowledge and scholarship:
Translations

erudite

[ˈerʊdaɪt] ADJerudito

erudite

[ˈɛrʊdaɪt] adj [person] → érudit(e); [book, style] → savant(e)

erudite

adjgelehrt; person alsogebildet, belesen

erudite

[ˈɛrʊˌdaɪt] adjerudito/a
References in classic literature ?
His professional brethren, each for himself, adopted various hypotheses, more or less plausible, but all dressed out in a perplexing mystery of phrase, which, if it do not show a bewilderment of mind in these erudite physicians, certainly causes it in the unlearned peruser of their opinions.
At all events, if it involved any secret information in regard to old Roger Chillingworth, it was in a tongue unknown to the erudite clergyman, and did but increase the bewilderment of his mind.
Did erudite Stubb, mounted upon your capstan, deliver lectures on the anatomy of the Cetacea; and by help of the windlass, hold up a specimen rib for exhibition?
When she had been here four or five weeks she was already erudite in military things, and they made her an officer - a double officer.
The same sort of process has perhaps been undergone by wiser men, when they have been cut off from faith and love--only, instead of a loom and a heap of guineas, they have had some erudite research, some ingenious project, or some well-knit theory.
As regarded her attainments, the only fault to be found with them was the same that a fastidious connoisseur might have found with her beauty, that they were somewhat too erudite and masculine for so young a person.
As he had no reason to complain of the reception of that erudite work by the public, he was now disposed to retain me in a similar position with respect to the present volume, which he entitled TANGLEWOOD TALES.
He reads a chapter in the guidebooks, mixes the facts all up, with his bad memory, and then goes off to inflict the whole mess on somebody as wisdom which has been festering in his brain for years and which he gathered in college from erudite authors who are dead now and out of print.
Nor did it precisely comport with my preconceived ideas of the dignity of divine messengers," remarked Professor Porter, "when the--ah--gentleman tied two highly respectable and erudite scholars neck to neck and dragged them through the jungle as though they had been cows.
Bulstrode, appeared to have found an agreeable resort in this certainly not erudite household.
A curious, an erudite artist, certainly, he is to some extent an experimenter in rhyme or metre, often hazardous.
The erudite gentleman in whom I confided congealed before I was half through