erythroid


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Related to erythroid: erythroid cells, Erythroid progenitor cells

erythroid

(ɪˈrɪθrɔɪd)
adj
1. (Colours) red or reddish
2. (Biochemistry) biochem relating to erythrocytes
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Adj.1.erythroid - relating to erythrocytes
Translations

er·y·throid

n. eritroide, de color semejante al rojo.
References in periodicals archive ?
Due to lack of renal erythropoietin production, the essentially normal bone marrow is incapable of undergoing a compensatory erythroid hyperplasia to counteract such hematologic side effects of uremia as excessive blood loss, hemolysis, and shortened red cell life span.
Bone marrow aspirates show hypercellularity and and increased myeloid to erythroid ratio (> 25:1).
In summary, these mechanisms initiate a decreased iron concentration in the circulation, thereby limiting iron availability for erythroid cells.
No other important findings were noted, except for an evident increase in myeloid series and megakaryocytes (more evident in erythroid series) on bone marrow aspiration and biopsy.
Hematoxylin and eosin stain showed numerous megakaryocytes, myeloid and erythroid precursors, and extracellular blood products (hemosiderin).
Stanford University (Palo Alto, CA) has patented a substantially enriched mammalian hematopoietic cell subpopulation, which is characterized by progenitor cell activity for lymphoid lineages, but lacking the potential to differentiate into myeloid and erythroid lineages.
The bone marrow aspiration showed severe hypocellularity secondary to a marked decrease in megacaryocytes, granulocytes, and erythroid cells; the morphology of the marrow elements was normal.
The cells stained with CD31 (figure, B) and glycophorin, which indicated the presence of a mixture of megakaryocytic and erythroid cells.
All 13 patients were positive for antibodies that could inhibit the formation of erythroid colonies by normal bone marrow cells (N.
Several chapters deal with the physiology of human iron transport and its delivery to target tissues, both erythroid and nonerythroid.
A loss of erythrocytes, they suggested, would force the bone marrow to use even younger cells -- erythroid progenitors -- to make blood.
Inflammation-induced synthesis of hepcidin plays a crucial role in macrophage iron retention, which underlies the anemia of chronic disease by limiting the availability of iron for erythroid progenitor cells.
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