escapade


Also found in: Thesaurus, Legal, Wikipedia.

es·ca·pade

 (ĕs′kə-pād′)
n.
An adventurous, unconventional act or undertaking.

[French, a trick, an escape, from Old French, from Old Spanish escapada (from escapar, to escape) or from Old Italian scappata (from scappare, to escape), both from Vulgar Latin *excappāre, to escape; see escape.]

escapade

(ˈɛskəˌpeɪd; ˌɛskəˈpeɪd)
n
1. a wild or exciting adventure, esp one that is mischievous or unlawful; scrape
2. any lighthearted or carefree episode; prank; romp
[C17: from French, from Old Italian scappata, from Vulgar Latin ex-cappāre (unattested) to escape]

es•ca•pade

(ˈɛs kəˌpeɪd, ˌɛs kəˈpeɪd)

n.
1. a reckless adventure or wild prank, esp. one contrary to usual or proper behavior.
2. Archaic. an escape from confinement or restraint.
[1645–55; < French < Sp escapada=escap(ar) to escape + -ada -ade1]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.escapade - a wild and exciting undertaking (not necessarily lawful)escapade - a wild and exciting undertaking (not necessarily lawful)
project, task, undertaking, labor - any piece of work that is undertaken or attempted; "he prepared for great undertakings"
2.escapade - any carefree episode
diversion, recreation - an activity that diverts or amuses or stimulates; "scuba diving is provided as a diversion for tourists"; "for recreation he wrote poetry and solved crossword puzzles"; "drug abuse is often regarded as a form of recreation"
sexcapade - a sexual escapade; an illicit affair

escapade

noun adventure, fling, stunt, romp, trick, scrape (informal), spree, mischief, lark (informal), caper, prank, antic The whole ridiculous escapade was his idea.
Translations
طَيْش، مُجازَفَه
eskapadenummer
ævintÿri, uppátæki
šunybė
pārdrošs pasākums
výstrelok
gençlik çapkınlığıhaylazlık

escapade

[ˌeskəˈpeɪd] N (= adventure) → aventura f; (= misdeed) → travesura f

escapade

[ˌɛskəˈpeɪd ˈɛskəpeɪd] n (= adventure) → équipée f

escapade

nEskapade f

escapade

[ˌɛskəˈpeɪd] n (adventure) → avventura; (misdeed) → scappatella

escapade

(eskəˈpeid) noun
a daring or adventurous act, often one that is disapproved of by others. Have you heard about his latest escapade?
References in classic literature ?
The reckoning with his wife at the end of an escapade was something he counted on--like the last powerful liqueur after a long dinner.
Of course," I stammered, "I cannot expect you to understand the situation, though I think, if you would allow me, I could in a very few words make it somewhat clearer,--make you realise that, after all, it has been a very innocent and childish escapade, in which there has been no harm and a great deal of pleasure--"
All the time I was washing out the block house, and then washing up the things from dinner, this disgust and envy kept growing stronger and stronger, till at last, being near a bread-bag, and no one then observing me, I took the first step towards my escapade and filled both pockets of my coat with biscuit.
Yet, though he loved it, he had not let his selfish desires outweigh the sense of duty that had brought him to a realization of the moral wrong which lay beneath the adventurous escapade that had brought him to Africa.
I came off too, to report the only exclusive information that is given today regarding the strange escapade at the Zoo.
Fix the detective, had foreseen the advantage which Passepartout's escapade gave him, and, delaying his departure for twelve hours, had consulted the priests of Malabar Hill.
Planchet, who was still a little concerned for his safety after his recent escapade, declared that he would follow D'Artagnan even to the end of the world, either by the road to the right or by that to the left; only he begged his former master to set out in the evening, for greater security to himself.
But the picture I had in my eye, coloured and simple like an illustration to a nursery-book tale of two venturesome children's escapade, was what fascinated me most.
She had hardly listened to his instructions when she saw you coming downstairs, on which she closed the window rapidly and told you about one of the servants' escapade with her wooden-legged lover, which was all perfectly true.
Though he expected that the story of his escapade would be already known in Moscow and that the ladies about his father- who were never favorably disposed toward him- would have used it to turn the count against him, he nevertheless on the day of his arrival went to his father's part of the house.
He had managed to coax old Brus, the gardener, into letting him have the key to the little postern gate on the plea that he wished to indulge in a midnight escapade, hinting broadly of a fair lady who was to be the partner of his adventure, and, what was more to the point with Brus, at the same time slipping a couple of golden zecchins into the gardener's palm.
1791, just after Wordsworth had left the University; but here his most striking exploit was a brief escapade of running away and enlisting in a cavalry troop.