escheat

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es·cheat

 (ĭs-chēt′)
n.
1. Reversion of land held under feudal tenure to the manor in the absence of legal heirs or claimants.
2. Law
a. Reversion of property to the state in the absence of legal heirs or claimants.
b. Property that has reverted to the state when no legal heirs or claimants exist.
intr. & tr.v. es·cheat·ed, es·cheat·ing, es·cheats Law
To revert or cause to revert by escheat.

[Middle English eschete, from Old French (from escheoir, to fall out) and from Anglo-Latin escheta, both from Vulgar Latin *excadēre, to fall out : Latin ex-, ex- + Latin cadere, to fall; see kad- in Indo-European roots.]

es·cheat′a·ble adj.

escheat

(ɪsˈtʃiːt) law
n
1. (Law) (in England before 1926) the reversion of property to the Crown in the absence of legal heirs
2. (Law) (in feudal times) the reversion of property to the feudal lord in the absence of legal heirs or upon outlawry of the tenant
3. (Law) the property so reverting
vb
(Law) to take (land) by escheat or (of land) to revert by escheat
[C14: from Old French eschete, from escheoir to fall to the lot of, from Late Latin excadere (unattested), from Latin cadere to fall]
esˈcheatable adj
esˈcheatage n

es•cheat

(ɛsˈtʃit)
Law. n.
1. the reverting of property to the state or, as in England, to the crown when there are no legal heirs.
2. the right to take property subject to escheat.
v.i.
3. (of property) to revert by escheat.
v.t.
4. to take or confiscate by escheat.
[1250–1300; Middle English eschete < Old French eschete, escheoite, feminine past participle of escheoir < Vulgar Latin *excadēre to fall to a person's share = Latin ex- ex-1 + cadere to fall (Vulgar Latin *cadēre)]
es•cheat′a•ble, adj.
es•cheat′or, n.

Escheat

 of lawyers—Lipton, 1970.

escheat


Past participle: escheated
Gerund: escheating

Imperative
escheat
escheat
Present
I escheat
you escheat
he/she/it escheats
we escheat
you escheat
they escheat
Preterite
I escheated
you escheated
he/she/it escheated
we escheated
you escheated
they escheated
Present Continuous
I am escheating
you are escheating
he/she/it is escheating
we are escheating
you are escheating
they are escheating
Present Perfect
I have escheated
you have escheated
he/she/it has escheated
we have escheated
you have escheated
they have escheated
Past Continuous
I was escheating
you were escheating
he/she/it was escheating
we were escheating
you were escheating
they were escheating
Past Perfect
I had escheated
you had escheated
he/she/it had escheated
we had escheated
you had escheated
they had escheated
Future
I will escheat
you will escheat
he/she/it will escheat
we will escheat
you will escheat
they will escheat
Future Perfect
I will have escheated
you will have escheated
he/she/it will have escheated
we will have escheated
you will have escheated
they will have escheated
Future Continuous
I will be escheating
you will be escheating
he/she/it will be escheating
we will be escheating
you will be escheating
they will be escheating
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been escheating
you have been escheating
he/she/it has been escheating
we have been escheating
you have been escheating
they have been escheating
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been escheating
you will have been escheating
he/she/it will have been escheating
we will have been escheating
you will have been escheating
they will have been escheating
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been escheating
you had been escheating
he/she/it had been escheating
we had been escheating
you had been escheating
they had been escheating
Conditional
I would escheat
you would escheat
he/she/it would escheat
we would escheat
you would escheat
they would escheat
Past Conditional
I would have escheated
you would have escheated
he/she/it would have escheated
we would have escheated
you would have escheated
they would have escheated
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.escheat - a reversion to the state (as the ultimate owner of property) in the absence of legal heirs
law, jurisprudence - the collection of rules imposed by authority; "civilization presupposes respect for the law"; "the great problem for jurisprudence to allow freedom while enforcing order"
reversion - (law) an interest in an estate that reverts to the grantor (or his heirs) at the end of some period (e.g., the death of the grantee)
2.escheat - the property that reverts to the state
transferred possession, transferred property - a possession whose ownership changes or lapses
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
Non-tax revenue - which includes escheats, or unclaimed property for the state, and interest on commonwealth investments - totaled $128.
In summary, if the holder of unclaimed property can determine the state of the property owner's residence using registration address data, then the holder escheats the property to that state (see Exhibit 1).
Reduce workloads involving abandoned property that is returned to the state, or escheats.
The panel also recommended using a portion of the state Escheats Fund or money for state government pensions to invest in bioscience companies.
They hold transcripts of charters, patent rolls, escheats, wills, petitions and other family, legal and land records, written in Anglo-Norman French, Latin and old English.
It thus held that owner-unknown property escheats to the state in which the debtor is incorporated.
The literary fund is a constitutional perpetual fund for school purposes that receives escheats, fines, forfeitures, unclaimed property, and unclaimed lottery prizes.
Goodman will offer practical advice on how to tighten internal controls, prevent malfeasance, stop theft, detect red flags, and safeguard company assets for five vulnerable P2P processes - maintaining the master vendor file; p-card purchasing; accounting for airline flights; recording/accruing of expenses; and managing voids and escheats.
Conversely, if escheat property is reported in the fund to which it ultimately escheats, a liability for probable future payments should be recognized to reduce the amount of revenue reported.
Under the secondary rule, property for which there is no owner's last known address escheats to the holder's state of "corporate domicile" (state of incorporation).
9 million surplus came from corporate taxes and escheats," Fajt said.
As noted, a state does not own the property that escheats to it; it merely holds it until the true owner can be found or comes forward to claim the property.