esophagus


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to esophagus: Esophagus spasm, Esophagus cancer

e·soph·a·gus

also oe·soph·a·gus (ĭ-sŏf′ə-gəs)
n. pl. e·soph·a·gi (-jī′, -gī′) also oe·soph·a·gi
The muscular tube by which food passes from the pharynx to the stomach; the gullet.

[Middle English isophagus, from Medieval Latin ēsophagus, from Greek oisophagos, arbitrary medical coinage perhaps from ois- : future tense stem of pherein, to carry; see oit- in the Appendix of Indo-European roots + -phagos, food (unattested sense) (from phagein, to eat; see bhag- in the Appendix of Indo-European roots).]

e·soph′a·ge′al (-jē′əl) adj.

esophagus

(iːˈsɒfəɡəs)
n, pl -gi (-ˌdʒaɪ) or -guses
(Anatomy) the US spelling of oesophagus
esophageal adj

e•soph•a•gus

(ɪˈsɒf ə gəs, iˈsɒf-)

n., pl. -gi (-ˌdʒaɪ, ˌgaɪ)
a muscular tube for the passage of food from the pharynx to the stomach; gullet.
[1350–1400; < Medieval Latin isophagus, esophagus < Greek oisophágos gullet]

e·soph·a·gus

(ĭ-sŏf′ə-gəs)
The tube of the digestive tract through which food passes from the throat to the stomach.

esophagus

The muscular tube through which food travels between the pharynx and stomach.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.esophagus - the passage between the pharynx and the stomachesophagus - the passage between the pharynx and the stomach
passageway, passage - a path or channel or duct through or along which something may pass; "the nasal passages"
muscle system, muscular structure, musculature - the muscular system of an organism
alimentary canal, alimentary tract, digestive tract, digestive tube, gastrointestinal tract, GI tract - tubular passage of mucous membrane and muscle extending about 8.3 meters from mouth to anus; functions in digestion and elimination
epicardia - the short part of the esophagus extending downward from the diaphragm to the stomach
cardiac sphincter - the valve between the distal end of the esophagus and the stomach; the physiological sphincter at the esophagogastric junction
Translations

e·soph·a·gus

n. esófago, porción del tubo digestivo situado entre la faringe y el estómago.

esophagus

n (pl -gi) esófago; Barrett’s o Barrett — esófago de Barrett
References in periodicals archive ?
a world leader in products to treat pre-cancerous tissue in the esophagus, reported today that the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) in the United Kingdom has published new guidelines approving the use of radiofrequency ablation for the eradication of dysplastic Barrett's esophagus.
Gastroenterologists, using a special catheter, spray liquid nitrogen on the damaged tissue to freeze the superficial lining of the esophagus, the long tube that carries food from the throat to the stomach.
Over time, the persistent acid bath can cause normal epithelial cells in the esophagus to change into tougher, more acid-resistant cells of the type found in the stomach and intestine, explained Dr.
Esophagoscopy revealed that nearly all of the mucosa was salmon-colored, a finding that is consistent with Barrett esophagus and that was confirmed on biopsy.
Materials and Methods: All patients with Barrett's esophagus and high-grade dysplasia were evaluated with computed tomography and endosonography.
Key recommendations include avoiding overweight and obesity, which increase risk of cancer of the esophagus, kidney, colon, and breast; eating at least 13 ounces of fruits and vegetables daily to reduce risk of cancer of the esophagus, stomach, colon, and mouth; limiting or avoiding red meat and preserved meat to reduce risk of colon cancer; moderating salt intake to reduce risk of stomach cancer; and avoiding very hot or scalding drinks and foods to reduce risk of cancer of the mouth and esophagus.
The pharynx is attached to two pathways: a pipe that carries air to your lungs, and the esophagus (food pipe), which delivers food to your stomach.
When the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) is weakened or relaxes too frequently, acid can flow back into the esophagus.
A genetic abnormality in people with cancer of the esophagus might guide physicians in diagnosing and treating such patients and could become an indicator of cancer recurrences, report researchers at the University of Maryland School of Medicine in Baltimore.
Although the link to increased leukemias and lymphomas had been reported in two earlier studies, the relationship to mouth, throat, and esophagus cancers had not previously been reported for workers exposed to internally deposited radionuclides in this low-dose range.
Jesper Lagergren and colleagues interviewed 189 Swedish patients with adenocarcinoma of the esophagus about symptoms of heartburn they had at least five years before their cancers were diagnosed.
The backflow (reflux) of stomach acid into the lower end of the esophagus causes chronic heartburn (more correctly termed reflux esophagitis) and produces inflammation and irritation of the esophageal lining.