esteemed


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Related to esteemed: unobtrusive

es·teem

 (ĭ-stēm′)
tr.v. es·teemed, es·teem·ing, es·teems
1. To regard with respect; prize. See Synonyms at appreciate.
2. To regard as; consider: esteemed it an honor to help them.
n.
1. Favorable regard; respect. See Synonyms at regard.
2. Archaic Judgment; opinion.

[Middle English estemen, to appraise, from Old French estimer, from Latin aestimāre.]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.esteemed - having an illustrious reputation; respected; "our esteemed leader"; "a prestigious author"
reputable - having a good reputation; "a reputable business"; "a reputable scientist"; "a reputable wine"
Translations
References in classic literature ?
He never spoke of himself, and no one ever knew that in his native city he had been a man much honored and esteemed for learning and integrity, till a countryman came to see him.
That afternoon she was telling me how highly esteemed our friend the badger was in her part of the world, and how men kept a special kind of dog, with very short legs, to hunt him.
They were women who idolized their children, worshiped their husbands, and esteemed it a holy privilege to efface themselves as individuals and grow wings as ministering angels.
Still is this a breed highly esteemed and, as you witness, much honored with the burdens it is often destined to bear.
Soon after, I returned home to my family with a determination to bring them as soon as possible to live in Kentucke, which I esteemed a second paradise, at the risk of my life and fortune.
They spent much of their abundant leisure on the margin of Maule's well, which was haunted by a kind of snail, evidently a titbit to their palates; and the brackish water itself, however nauseous to the rest of the world, was so greatly esteemed by these fowls, that they might be seen tasting, turning up their heads, and smacking their bills, with precisely the air of wine-bibbers round a probationary cask.
He was heard to speak of Sir Kenelm Digby and other famous men -- whose scientific attainments were esteemed hardly less than supernatural -- as having been his correspondents or associates.
He was, moreover, esteemed by the women as a man of great erudition, for he had read several books quite through, and was a perfect master of Cotton Mather's "History of New England Witchcraft," in which, by the way, he most firmly and potently believed.
Yet such as these even are commonly esteemed good citizens.