estimate


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es·ti·mate

 (ĕs′tə-māt′)
tr.v. es·ti·mat·ed, es·ti·mat·ing, es·ti·mates
1. To calculate approximately (the amount, extent, magnitude, position, or value of something).
2. To form an opinion about; evaluate: "While an author is yet living we estimate his powers by his worst performance" (Samuel Johnson).
n. (-mĭt)
1.
a. A tentative evaluation or rough calculation, as of worth, quantity, or size: an estimate of the damage caused by the storm.
b. A statement of the approximate cost of work to be done, such as a building project or car repairs.
2. A judgment based on one's impressions; an opinion: I have a high estimate of his character.

[Latin aestimāre, aestimāt-.]

es′ti·ma′tive adj.
es′ti·ma′tor n.
Synonyms: estimate, appraise, assess, evaluate, rate1
These verbs have to do with the consideration of judgment in ascertaining value or weighing the relative merits of something: estimated the street value of the drugs to be $500,000; appraised the diamond ring; assessing real estate for investors; evaluated a student's thesis for content and organization; rated the restaurant higher than any other in the city.

estimate

vb
1. (Surveying) to form an approximate idea of (distance, size, cost, etc); calculate roughly; gauge
2. (tr; may take a clause as object) to form an opinion about; judge: to estimate one's chances.
3. (Commerce) to submit (an approximate price) for (a job) to a prospective client
4. (Statistics) (tr) statistics to assign a value (a point estimate) or range of values (an interval estimate) to a parameter of a population on the basis of sampling statistics. See estimator
n
5. an approximate calculation
6. (Commerce) a statement indicating the likely charge for or cost of certain work
7. a judgment; appraisal; opinion
[C16: from Latin aestimāre to assess the worth of, of obscure origin]
ˈestimative adj

es•ti•mate

(v. ˈɛs təˌmeɪt; n. -mɪt, -ˌmeɪt)

v. -mat•ed, -mat•ing,
n. v.t.
1. to form an approximate judgment or opinion regarding the worth, amount, size, weight, etc., of; calculate approximately: to estimate costs.
2. to form an opinion of; judge.
v.i.
3. to make an estimate.
n.
4. an approximate judgment or calculation, as of the value, amount, time, size, or weight of something.
5. a judgment or opinion, as of the qualities of a person or thing.
6. a statement of the approximate charge for work to be done, submitted by a person or firm ready to undertake the work.
[1525–35; < Latin aestimātus, past participle of aestimāre to value, estimate; see -ate1]
es′ti•ma`tive, adj.
es′ti•ma`tor, n.

estimate

1. An analysis of a foreign situation, development, or trend that identifies its major elements, interprets the significance, and appraises the future possibilities and the prospective results of the various actions that might be taken.
2. An appraisal of the capabilities, vulnerabilities, and potential courses of action of a foreign nation or combination of nations in consequence of a specific national plan, policy, decision, or contemplated course of action.
3. An analysis of an actual or contemplated clandestine operation in relation to the situation in which it is or would be conducted in order to identify and appraise such factors as available as well as needed assets and potential obstacles, accomplishments, and consequences. See also intelligence estimate.

estimate


Past participle: estimated
Gerund: estimating

Imperative
estimate
estimate
Present
I estimate
you estimate
he/she/it estimates
we estimate
you estimate
they estimate
Preterite
I estimated
you estimated
he/she/it estimated
we estimated
you estimated
they estimated
Present Continuous
I am estimating
you are estimating
he/she/it is estimating
we are estimating
you are estimating
they are estimating
Present Perfect
I have estimated
you have estimated
he/she/it has estimated
we have estimated
you have estimated
they have estimated
Past Continuous
I was estimating
you were estimating
he/she/it was estimating
we were estimating
you were estimating
they were estimating
Past Perfect
I had estimated
you had estimated
he/she/it had estimated
we had estimated
you had estimated
they had estimated
Future
I will estimate
you will estimate
he/she/it will estimate
we will estimate
you will estimate
they will estimate
Future Perfect
I will have estimated
you will have estimated
he/she/it will have estimated
we will have estimated
you will have estimated
they will have estimated
Future Continuous
I will be estimating
you will be estimating
he/she/it will be estimating
we will be estimating
you will be estimating
they will be estimating
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been estimating
you have been estimating
he/she/it has been estimating
we have been estimating
you have been estimating
they have been estimating
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been estimating
you will have been estimating
he/she/it will have been estimating
we will have been estimating
you will have been estimating
they will have been estimating
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been estimating
you had been estimating
he/she/it had been estimating
we had been estimating
you had been estimating
they had been estimating
Conditional
I would estimate
you would estimate
he/she/it would estimate
we would estimate
you would estimate
they would estimate
Past Conditional
I would have estimated
you would have estimated
he/she/it would have estimated
we would have estimated
you would have estimated
they would have estimated
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.estimate - an approximate calculation of quantity or degree or worthestimate - an approximate calculation of quantity or degree or worth; "an estimate of what it would cost"; "a rough idea how long it would take"
scalage - estimation of the amount of lumber in a log
figuring, reckoning, calculation, computation - problem solving that involves numbers or quantities
credit rating, credit - an estimate, based on previous dealings, of a person's or an organization's ability to fulfill their financial commitments
dead reckoning, guessing, guesswork, guess, shot - an estimate based on little or no information
guesstimate, guestimate - an estimate that combines reasoning with guessing
overrating, overreckoning, overestimate, overestimation - a calculation that results in an estimate that is too high
underestimate, underestimation, underrating, underreckoning - an estimation that is too low; an estimate that is less than the true or actual value
2.estimate - a judgment of the qualities of something or somebody; "many factors are involved in any estimate of human life"; "in my estimation the boy is innocent"
judgment, assessment, judgement - the act of judging or assessing a person or situation or event; "they criticized my judgment of the contestants"
appraisal - an expert estimation of the quality, quantity, and other characteristics of someone or something
capitalisation, capitalization - an estimation of the value of a business
3.estimate - a document appraising the value of something (as for insurance or taxation)
commercial document, commercial instrument - a document of or relating to commerce
overappraisal, overestimate, overestimation, overvaluation - an appraisal that is too high
4.estimate - a statement indicating the likely cost of some job; "he got an estimate from the car repair shop"
statement - a message that is stated or declared; a communication (oral or written) setting forth particulars or facts etc; "according to his statement he was in London on that day"
5.estimate - the respect with which a person is held; "they had a high estimation of his ability"
esteem, respect, regard - an attitude of admiration or esteem; "she lost all respect for him"
reputation, report - the general estimation that the public has for a person; "he acquired a reputation as an actor before he started writing"; "he was a person of bad report"
Verb1.estimate - judge tentatively or form an estimate of (quantities or time)estimate - judge tentatively or form an estimate of (quantities or time); "I estimate this chicken to weigh three pounds"
compute, calculate, cipher, cypher, figure, reckon, work out - make a mathematical calculation or computation
quantise, quantize - approximate (a signal varying continuously in amplitude) by one whose amplitude is restricted to a prescribed set of discrete values
misgauge - gauge something incorrectly or improperly
put, place, set - estimate; "We put the time of arrival at 8 P.M."
give - estimate the duration or outcome of something; "He gave the patient three months to live"; "I gave him a very good chance at success"
lowball, underestimate - make a deliberately low estimate; "The construction company wanted the contract badly and lowballed"
assess - estimate the value of (property) for taxation; "Our house hasn't been assessed in years"
make - calculate as being; "I make the height about 100 feet"
reckon, count - take account of; "You have to reckon with our opponents"; "Count on the monsoon"
truncate - approximate by ignoring all terms beyond a chosen one; "truncate a series"
guesstimate - estimate based on a calculation
overestimate, overrate - make too high an estimate of; "He overestimated his own powers"
lowball, underestimate - make a deliberately low estimate; "The construction company wanted the contract badly and lowballed"
2.estimate - judge to be probable
pass judgment, evaluate, judge - form a critical opinion of; "I cannot judge some works of modern art"; "How do you evaluate this grant proposal?" "We shouldn't pass judgment on other people"
take into account, allow - allow or plan for a certain possibility; concede the truth or validity of something; "I allow for this possibility"; "The seamstress planned for 5% shrinkage after the first wash"

estimate

verb
1. calculate roughly, value, guess, judge, reckon, assess, evaluate, gauge, number, appraise His personal riches were estimated at over £8 million.
2. think, believe, consider, rate, judge, hold, rank, guess, reckon, assess, conjecture, surmise Officials estimate it will be two days before electricity is restored to the island.
noun
1. approximate calculation, guess, reckoning, assessment, judgment, evaluation, valuation, appraisal, educated guess, guesstimate (informal), rough calculation, ballpark figure (informal), approximate cost, approximate price, ballpark estimate (informal), appraisement This figure is five times the original estimate.
2. assessment, opinion, belief, appraisal, evaluation, conjecture, appraisement, judgment, estimation, surmise I was wrong in my estimate of his capabilities.

estimate

verb
1. To calculate approximately:
2. To make a judgment as to the worth or value of:
noun
1. The act or result of judging the worth or value of something or someone:
2. A rough or tentative calculation:
Translations
تَقْديرتَقْدِيريُقَدِّر، يُخَمِّنيُقَيِّمُيُقَيِّم، يُثَمِّنُ عالِياً
odhadodhadnout
skønskønnevurderevurdering
hinnang
arvioarvioida
procijenitiprocjena
becslés
áætla, gera sér hugmynd umkostnaîaráætlunmeta, áætla
見積もり見積もる
견적추정하다
apskaičiavimaiapytikriai apskaičiuotinuomonėsąmata
aprēķinātkalkulācijanovērtējumsnovērtētspriest
ocenaoceniti
uppskattningskattninguppskatta
การประเมินประมาณ
sự ước tínhước tính

estimate

[ˈestɪmɪt]
A. N
1. (= judgment) → estimación f, cálculo m; (= approximate assessment) (for work etc) → presupuesto m
to form an estimate of sth/sbformarse una opinión de algo/algn
to give sb an estimate of [+ cost etc] → presentar a algn un presupuesto de
rough estimatecálculo m aproximativo
at a rough estimateaproximadamente
2. Estimates (Parl) → presupuestos mpl generales del Estado
B. [ˈestɪmeɪt] VT (= judge) → calcular aproximadamente; (= assess) → juzgar, estimar
to estimate thatcalcular que
to estimate the cost atcalcular el precio en ...
C. [ˈestɪmeɪt] VI to estimate for [+ building work etc] → hacer un presupuesto de

estimate

[ˈɛstɪmət]
n
(= approximate calculation) → estimation f
at a rough estimate → approximativement
(= assessment) → appréciation f
(= statement of likely cost) → devis m
to give sb an estimate → faire un devis à qn, donner un devis à qn
[ˈɛstɪmeɪt] vt [+ speed, amount] → estimer
to be estimated at → être estimé(e) à
The damage was estimated at 300 million pounds → Les dégâts étaient estimés à 300 millions de livres.
to estimate (that) → estimer que
They estimated it would take three weeks → Ils ont estimé que cela prendrait trois semaines.
[ˈɛstɪmeɪt] vi (British) to estimate for sth (= bid for) → faire un devis pour qch

estimate

n
(= approximate calculation)Schätzung f; (= valuation: by antique dealer etc) → Taxierung f; what’s your estimate of our chances of success?wie schätzen Sie unsere Erfolgschancen ein?; £100/it is just an estimate£ 100/das ist nur geschätzt; at a rough estimategrob geschätzt, über den Daumen gepeilt (inf); at a conservative estimatevorsichtig geschätzt; at the lowest estimatemindestens, wenigstens
(Comm, of cost) → (Kosten)voranschlag m; to get an estimateeinen (Kosten)voranschlag einholen
estimates pl (= government costs)Haushalt m, → Budget nt
vt cost, price(ein)schätzen; distance, speedschätzen; his wealth is estimated at …sein Vermögen wird auf … geschätzt; I estimate she must be 40ich schätze sie auf 40, ich schätze, dass sie 40 ist; estimated time of arrivalvoraussichtliche Ankunft; estimated time of departurevoraussichtliche Abfahrt; (Aviat) → voraussichtlicher Abflug
vischätzen; I’m just estimatingdas schätze ich nur

estimate

[n ˈɛstɪmɪt; vb ˈɛstiˌmeɪt]
1. n (judgment) → valutazione f, stima (Comm) (for work to be done) → preventivo
to give sb an estimate of → fare a qn un preventivo (or una stima) di
at a rough estimate → ad un calcolo approssimativo
2. vtvalutare, stimare (Comm) → preventivare
we estimate the cost to be £150 → preventiviamo un costo di circa 150 sterline
3. vi (Comm) to estimate forfare il preventivo per

estimate

(ˈestimeit) verb
1. to judge size, amount, value etc, especially roughly or without measuring. He estimated that the journey would take two hours.
2. to form an idea or judgement of how good etc something is. I estimated my chances of escape as very good.
(-mət) noun
a calculation (eg of the probable cost etc of something). He gave us an estimate of the cost of repairing the stonework; a rough estimate.
ˌestiˈmation noun
judgement; opinion. In my estimation, he is the more gifted artist of the two.

estimate

تَقْدِير, يُقَيِّمُ odhad, odhadnout skøn, skønne schätzen, Schätzung εκτίμηση, υπολογίζω calcular, cálculo aproximado arvio, arvioida estimation, estimer procijeniti, procjena stima, stimare 見積もり, 見積もる 견적, 추정하다 schatten, schatting anslå, kostnadsoverslag oszacować, oszacowanie estimar, estimativa оценивать, оценка uppskatta, uppskattning การประเมิน, ประมาณ tahmin, tahminde bulunmak sự ước tính, ước tính 估计
References in classic literature ?
Pray make Brooke useful, and draw on me for funds if expenses exceed your estimate.
He is a soldier, and knows how to estimate the chances of the woods.
These, and all such writers of society, whose new works glow like the rich texture of a just-woven carpet, must be content to relinquish their charm, for every reader, after an age or two, and could hardly be supposed to retain any portion of it for a mind that had utterly lost its estimate of modes and manners.
It is essential, in order to a complete estimate of the advantages of official life, to view the incumbent at the in-coming of a hostile administration.
I would have you investigate it now with the sole view of forming to yourself some unexaggerated, intelligent estimate of whatever battering-ram power may be lodged there.
Into it he drops a sum of money--a dollar, or perhaps five dollars, according to his power, and his estimate of the value of the privilege.
To have a great gang of seven hundred, whom I could not know personally, or feel any individual interest in, bought and driven, housed, fed, worked like so many horned cattle, strained up to military precision,--the question of how little of life's commonest enjoyments would keep them in working order being a constantly recurring problem,--the necessity of drivers and overseers,--the ever-necessary whip, first, last, and only argument,--the whole thing was insufferably disgusting and loathsome to me; and when I thought of my mothcr's estimate of one poor human soul, it became even frightful!
It shames the average man to be valued below his own estimate of his worth, and the king certainly wasn't anything more than an average man, if he was up that high.
The average at that time in the Grand Duchy of Baden was forty-five to a young person (when alone), according to the official estimate of the home secretary for that year; the average for older people was shifty and indeterminable, for whenever a wholesome young girl came into the presence of her elders she immediately lowered their average and raised her own.
They tried to estimate how long they had been in the cave, but all they knew was that it seemed days and weeks, and yet it was plain that this could not be, for their candles were not gone yet.
The nearest estimate I can give makes me now between twenty-seven and twenty- eight years of age.
If you were as much guided by nature in your estimate of men and women, and as little under the power of fancy and whim in your dealings with them, as you are where these children are concerned, we might always think alike.