eternalist

eternalist

(ɪˈtɜːnəlɪst)
n
(Philosophy) philosophy a person who believes in the eternal existence of matter or the world
References in periodicals archive ?
They claim the Pali conception of the person involves a middle-way posit between nihilist (anatman: the negation of the existence of a self) and eternalist (atman: soul, conceived as eternal) extremes, and they conclude that Pali Buddhism "falls under the general rubric of compatibilism and 'soft' determinism" (289).
In part because the authors do not wish to prejudge any metaphysical disputes--in particular they do not want to take a stand on whether one ought to be a possibilist rather than an actualist, or an eternalist rather than a presentist--they scrupulously offer very careful explications of current actualist and possibilist modal semantics as well as eternalist and presentist tense semantics.
Accordingly, even possibilist eternalists are inclined to say that that you and I are mereological fusions of objects at different times (we are fusions of temporal parts and hence we are four-dimensional objects) but are inclined to reject the analogous contention that you and I are fusions of objects in other possible worlds and thus composed of a set of modal parts.
Adams's concern about beings "discarded by the universe" is surely a consequence of his eternalist beliefs.
24) At best, any eternal self is completely unrelated to the impermanent empirical self, but this still implies that the personality does not survive death (unchanged), which means that the eternalist view is not in fact a solution to Adams's dilemma.
An eternalist believes in a block universe: past, present, and future events are all on an equal footing.
Nowhere is this tension more explicit than in the cosmology they defend, which contrasts starkly with the eternalist model developed in al-Farabi's so-called emanationist treatises, Political Regime and Principles of the Opinions of the Inhabitants of the Virtuous City.
For the eternalist, this claim is easily expressed using the apparatus of quantification (i.
The Eternalist [the Mimamsaka], has also made an important point regarding the givenness of the language and the word-object connection.
The Annihilationists, on the other hand represented a reaction against Eternalists and advanced the view that there is no eternal self, and that the only valid form of knowledge was sense-perceptions.
Perdurantists, on the other hand, tend to be eternalists with respect to time.
Eternalists say that nonpresent entities (for instance dinosaurs) exist; presentists say that they do not.