ether


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e·ther

 (ē′thər)
n.
1. Any of a class of organic compounds in which two hydrocarbon groups are linked by an oxygen atom.
2. A volatile, highly flammable liquid, C4H10O, derived from distilling ethyl alcohol with sulfuric acid, used as a reagent and solvent, and formerly used as an anesthetic. Also called diethyl ether, ethyl ether.
3. The regions of space beyond the earth's atmosphere; the heavens.
4. The element believed in ancient and medieval civilizations to fill all space above the sphere of the moon and to compose the stars and planets.
5. Physics An all-pervading, infinitely elastic, massless medium formerly postulated as the medium of propagation of electromagnetic waves.

[Middle English, upper air, from Latin aethēr, from Greek aithēr.]

e·ther′ic (ĭ-thĕr′ĭk, ĭ-thîr′-) adj.

ether

(ˈiːθə)
n
1. (Elements & Compounds) Also called: diethyl ether, ethyl ether or ethoxyethane a colourless volatile highly flammable liquid with a characteristic sweetish odour, made by the reaction of sulphuric acid with ethanol: used as a solvent and anaesthetic. Formula: C2H5OC2H5
2. (Elements & Compounds) any of a class of organic compounds with the general formula ROR′ where R and R′ are alkyl groups, as in diethyl ether C2H5OC2H5
3. (General Physics) the ether the hypothetical medium formerly believed to fill all space and to support the propagation of electromagnetic waves
4. (Classical Myth & Legend) Greek myth the upper regions of the atmosphere; clear sky or heaven
5. a rare word for air
Also (for senses 3–5): aether
[C17: from Latin aether, from Greek aithēr, from aithein to burn]
etheric adj

e•ther

(ˈi θər)

n.
1.
a. Also called ethyl ether. a colorless, highly volatile, flammable liquid, C4H10O, having an aromatic odor and sweet burning taste, used as a solvent and formerly as an inhalant anesthetic.
b. (formerly) one of a class of compounds in which two organic groups are attached directly to an oxygen atom, having the general formula ROR.
2. upper regions of space; the clear sky; the heavens.
3. the medium supposed by the ancients to fill the upper regions of space.
4. a substance formerly supposed to occupy all space, accounting for the propagation of electromagnetic radiation through space.
[1350–1400; < Latin aethēr the upper air, ether < Greek aithḗr, akin to aíthein to glow, burn]
e•ther•ic (ɪˈθɛr ɪk, ɪˈθɪər-) adj.

e·ther

(ē′thər)
1. An organic compound in which two hydrocarbon groups are linked by an oxygen atom.
2. A colorless, flammable liquid, C4H10O. It is used as a solvent and was formerly used as an anesthetic.
3. A hypothetical medium formerly believed to permeate all space and to be the medium through which light and other electromagnetic radiation move. The existence of ether was disproved by the American physicists Albert Michelson and Edward Morley in 1887.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.ether - the fifth and highest element after air and earth and fire and water; was believed to be the substance composing all heavenly bodies
archaicism, archaism - the use of an archaic expression
element - one of four substances thought in ancient and medieval cosmology to constitute the physical universe; "the alchemists believed that there were four elements"
2.ether - any of a class of organic compounds that have two hydrocarbon groups linked by an oxygen atom
organic compound - any compound of carbon and another element or a radical
3.ether - a medium that was once supposed to fill all space and to support the propagation of electromagnetic wavesether - a medium that was once supposed to fill all space and to support the propagation of electromagnetic waves
medium - an intervening substance through which signals can travel as a means for communication
4.ether - a colorless volatile highly inflammable liquid formerly used as an inhalation anesthetic
enflurane, Ethrane - a nonflammable liquid (trade name Ethrane) used as an inhalation general anesthetic
Translations
الأثير
æter
ÄtherEther
éter
eterljósvaki
イーサーエーテル
eteris
ēteris
éter
eter
eterlokman ruhu

ether

[ˈiːθəʳ] N (Chem) → éter m

ether

[ˈiːθər] néther m

ether

n (Chem, poet) → Äther m

ether

[ˈiːθəʳ] netere m

ether

(ˈiːθə) noun
a colourless liquid used to dissolve fats etc, and, medically, as an anaesthetic.

e·ther

n. éter, fluido químico cuyo vapor es usado en anestesia general.

ether

n éter m
References in classic literature ?
Their heads might have been turned upside-down, so absolutely did they tread upon blue ether.
But, nevertheless, it is anything but agreeable to be haunted by a suspicion that one's intellect is dwindling away, or exhaling, without your consciousness, like ether out of a phial; so that, at every glance, you find a smaller and less volatile residuum.
in what rapt ether sails the world, of which the weariest will never weary?
Let me gaze on the form below me, While from yonder ether blue Look how the star of eve, bright and tender, lingers o'er me, To love thy beauty too
He knew what a spoken word was, and how it acted upon the air, or the ether, that carried its vibrations from the lips to the ear.
This product is then treated electrically, or rather certain proportions of refined electric vibrations are incorporated with it, and the result is then pumped to the five principal air centers of the planet where, as it is released, contact with the ether of space transforms it into atmosphere.
The phial, to which I next turned my attention, might have been about half full of a blood-red liquor, which was highly pungent to the sense of smell and seemed to me to contain phosphorus and some volatile ether.
Borne aloft Upon the clouds, on ether charioted, He flies with speed of lightning.
No, stay here and try to make Barrois drink the rest of this glass of ether and water.
He had traced through cold and heat, across the deeps of the oceans, with instruments of his own invention, over the inhospitable heart of the polar ice and the sterile visage of the deserts, league by league, patiently, unweariedly, remorselessly, from their ever-shifting cradle under the magnetic pole to their exalted death-bed in the utmost ether of the upper atmosphere each one of the Isoconical Tellurions Lavalle's Curves, as we call them today.
And I said -- "She is warmer than Dian: She rolls through an ether of sighs -- She revels in a region of sighs.
The studio then resembled not a studio, but a group of angels seated on a cloud in ether.