ethnocracy


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ethnocracy

a government controlled by a particular race or national group. — ethnocratic, adj.
See also: Race
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Myanmar's ethnocracy has systematically elevated Buddhist notions and values; as a result, the principles that define democracy, such as pluralism and parity, are elusive.
The Burmese scholar in an exclusive interview with FNA said that Aung San SuuKyi's leadership has been the direct product of the icon manufacturing by Western media and activists which was intended to give acceptability to what, he believes, is a "military-controlled ethnocracy, wrapped in Buddhism".
If authority is tied to an ethnic group or ethnic identity, the system is an ethnocracy, many of which are monarchies.
47) The term ethnocracy has been coined to describe this perspective.
Ndlovu-Gatsheni, S J (2012), "The death of the subject with a capital 'S' and the perils of belonging: A study of the construction of ethnocracy in Zimbabwe", Critical Aits: South-North Cultural & Media Studies, Vol 26, No 4, pp 525-546.
Today, the state is a unique combination of a liberal, parliamentary democracy, an ethnocracy, and a theocracy: There are freedom of expression, free elections, and an independent judiciary; yet there is not freedom of or from religion, and there is institutionalized discrimination against ethnic minorities.
For Israeli leaders such as Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, "the Jewish state" means Jews only, actually an ethnocracy, where Jews from anywhere in the world have the right to return while the 640,000 Palestinian refugees who fled the forced removals in 1947-49 continue to be homeless.
The ethnicist antisemitic argumentation can be found in the racist theory (its Romanian mentor was sociologist Traian Braileanu) that advocated racial purity or in the political propaganda in favour of ethnocracy (peasantry, Christian nationalism, corporative state).
1) For a history of Zionist attacks on Palestinians and land confiscations prior to 1948, see Yiftachel, Ethnocracy and Segev.
2) On Romanian exceptionalism, see Vladimir Tismaneanu, "Romanian Exceptionalism, Democracy, Ethnocracy, and Uncertain Pluralism in Post-Ceausescu Romania," in Karen Dawisha and Bruce Parrott (eds), Politics, Power, and the Struggle for Democracy in South-East Europe (New York, 1997), pp.
On the other hand, the "Acholi in particular had been told by their colonial masters that they were born warriors, effectively transforming them into a military ethnocracy.
Gradually it became clear that he asserted this noble political idea to justify his imperial war in Iraq; his government continued to support dictatorship and ethnocracy in Ethiopia and other countries.