ethnomethodology


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eth·no·meth·od·ol·o·gy

 (ĕth′nō-mĕth′ə-dŏl′ə-jē)
n.
The branch of sociology that deals with the codes and conventions of everyday social interactions and activities.

eth′no·meth′od·ol′o·gist n.

ethnomethodology

(ˌɛθnəʊmɛθəˈdɒlədʒɪ)
n
(Linguistics) a method of studying linguistic communication that emphasizes common-sense views of conversation and the world. Compare phenomenology

ethnomethodology

Associated with the sociologist Harold Garfinkel, ethnomethodology studies the ways in which people use everyday knowledge to interpret and understand the world and communicate with other people.
References in periodicals archive ?
Rawls, one of the major representatives of ethnomethodology, is known for her original reading of E.
Everyday Language: Studies in Ethnomethodology, New York: Irvington Press, 15-21.
However, its expression in the practice of empirical research stemmed from the so-called Chicago School, where important names like William Thomas and Florian Znaniecki (14), Harold Garfinkel (15) George Hebert Mead (16) and Robert Park (17) and other inaugurated sociologically important approaches, such as symbolic interactionism, ethnography, ethnomethodology and other.
Where there is complete subjectivity, this tends to be associated with methodological approaches such as grounded theory, ethnomethodology, symbolic interactionism (Blumer/Kuhn) and pragmatism.
We classified research traditions based on Hays and Singh's (2012) designations: case study, grounded theory, phenomenology, heuristic inquiry, consensual qualitative research, semiotics, life history, symbolic interaction, hermeneutics, narratology, ethnography, ethnomethodology, autoethnography, and participatory action research.
This edition has new examples, research, and expanded material on technology and qualitative methods, community-based participatory research, ethnomethodology, and conversation analysis, as well as coverage of emerging research techniques like ethical issues and internet research, expanded material on the use of electronic surveys and cell phones, and qualitative methods like online interviewing and netnography.
Therefore, it is possible to quote from Bourdieu (1977) with the idea of praxiology, Nicolini (2009a, 2009b, 2013) with the idea of shadowing, which is also supported by Gherardi (2012) and Czarniawska (2008), and Bispo and Godoy (2012, 2014) with ethnomethodology.
I did this accordingly, with participatory research and ethnomethodology substantially shaping the form of my project (cf Ybema, 2009).
Somewhat unique to my training as a social constructionist practitioner was an immersion in ethnomethodology (EM; Garfinkel, 1967; Heritage, 1984).
The study is framed by ethnomethodology (EM), an approach which seeks to describe people (or members') methods of sense-making as documented by them during their everyday interactions with others.
Talk and social structure: Studies in ethnomethodology and conversation analysis, Cambridge: Polity Press.