ethos

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e·thos

 (ē′thŏs′)
n.
The disposition, character, or fundamental values peculiar to a specific person, people, culture, or movement: "They cultivated a subversive alternative ethos" (Anthony Burgess).

[Greek ēthos, character; see s(w)e- in Indo-European roots.]

ethos

(ˈiːθɒs)
n
(Sociology) the distinctive character, spirit, and attitudes of a people, culture, era, etc: the revolutionary ethos.
[C19: from Late Latin: habit, from Greek]

e•thos

(ˈi θɒs, ˈi θoʊs, ˈɛθ ɒs, -oʊs)

n.
1. the fundamental character or spirit of a culture; the underlying sentiment that informs the beliefs, customs, or practices of a group or society.
2. the distinguishing character or disposition of a community, group, person, etc.
3. the moral element in dramatic literature that determines a character's action or behavior.
[1850–55; < Greek: custom, habit, character]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.ethos - (anthropology) the distinctive spirit of a culture or an era; "the Greek ethos"
attribute - an abstraction belonging to or characteristic of an entity
anthropology - the social science that studies the origins and social relationships of human beings

ethos

noun spirit, character, attitude, beliefs, ethic, tenor, disposition the whole British public school ethos

ethos

noun
The thought processes characteristic of an individual or group:
Idiom: what makes someone tick.
Translations
אתוס

ethos

[ˈiːθɒs] N [of culture, group] → espíritu m, escala f de valores

ethos

[ˈiːθɒs] nphilosophie fethyl alcohol [ˌiːθaɪlˈælkəhɒl] n (= ethanol) → alcool m éthylique

ethos

nGesinnung f, → Ethos nt

ethos

[ˈiːθɒs] n (of culture, group) → ethos m, norma di vita
References in periodicals archive ?
The ethoses of the AFRC and the awards are very similar; both were set up to support and celebrate innovation in manufacturing in Scotland.
5, Crime and Disorder Act 1998) of YOTs; as there are practitioners from organisations whose ethoses do not naturally blend well together, for example, the police (public protection/justice oriented) versus social services (welfare oriented).
They emerged from many ethoses who settled in South Siberia and Central Asia.
TWO opposing footballing ethoses renew battle this evening with Everton determined to prove once again that money does not necessarily buy success.
The contrast between two distinct ethoses of hope is evident even within the same story, separated merely by a single generation.
I conclude underlining the difficulties to provoke a dialogue between the two ethoses and with the ethic of Human Rights.