ethylamine


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Related to ethylamine: ethanamine

eth·yl·a·mine

 (ĕth′ə-lə-mēn′, -lăm′ən)
n.
A colorless volatile liquid, C2H7N, with a strong ammoniacal odor, used in petroleum refining and detergents and in organic synthesis. Also called ethanamine.

ethylamine

(ˈiːθaɪləˌmaɪn)
n
(Elements & Compounds) chem a colourless compound with an ammonia-like odour
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References in periodicals archive ?
Tyramine is one kind of monoamine, also known as 2-(4-hydroxyphenyl) ethylamine which occurs naturally in cheese and other foods.
Tenders are invited for Ethanol Ethylamine Ar/Acr Grade, 500Ml Packing, 500Mi X 08 4Liters, Rate Is Per Packing Including All Taxes 0.
At the same time, the researchers also detected the organic molecules methylamine and ethylamine, which are precursors to forming glycine.
In an other research two types of cotton were treated with anhydrous ethylamine, diethylamine, pyridine and aqueous solutions of sodium hydroxide (30%) and potassium hydroxide (40%) for 15 min to 50 h to check the impact on moisture regain tensile, mechanical, swelling and optical properties.
Amine compounds were identified and quantified based on comparison with standard curves constructed from pure compounds (histamine, methylamine, ethylamine and tyramine).
The isolates were phenotypically characterized by means of macro/micro-morphological and physiological features, as fermentation of glucose, maltose and sucrose; assimilation of the following carbon sources: D-Glucose, D-Galactose, D-Ribose, D-Xylose, L-Arabinose, D-Arabinose, L-Rhamnose, Sucrose, Maltose, Trealose, Cellobiose, Salicin, Melibiose, Lactose,Raffinose, Inulin, Starch, Glycerol, Erythritol, Ribitol, D-Glucitol, D-Mannitol, myo-Inositol, Lactate, Citrate, Tween 20, N-acetylglucosamine; assimilation of the following nitrogen sources: Nitrate, Nitrite, Ethylamine, Lysine, Creatine and Creatinine; starch formation; urea hydrolysis; Diazonium Blue B reaction; growth at 40 and 50[degrees]C and 50% D-Glucose, 10% NaCl/16% NaCl and in different temperatures.
The main culprits are alcohol, especially red wine, caffeine, the tyramines found in various nuts, fermented foods and aged cheeses, phenyl ethylamine in cocoa, nitrites and nitrates in processed meats, monosodium glutamate (MSG), aspartame, and sulfites used in dried fruits, but there are many others.
This study investigates the reaction between quinones such as p-benzoquinone, chloro-p-benzoquinone and methyl-p-benzoquinone and N-containing nucleophiles such as ammonia, methylamine and ethylamine.
The first lab study Clark worked on with Lovas and Tiemann was the pyrolysis of ethylamine to produce the transient species vinyl amine (89).