etymological


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et·y·mo·log·i·cal

 (ĕt′ə-mə-lŏj′ĭ-kəl) also et·y·mo·log·ic (-lŏj′ĭk)
adj.
Of or relating to etymology or based on the principles of etymology.

et′y·mo·log′i·cal·ly adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.etymological - based on or belonging to etymology; "I merely drew an etymological distinction"
Translations
etimološki
etymologisch
etimološki

etymological

[ˌetɪməˈlɒdʒɪkəl] ADJetimológico

etymological

[ˌɛtɪməˈlɒdʒɪkəl] adj [root] → étymologique

etymological

adj, etymologically
advetymologisch

etymological

[ˌɛtɪməˈlɒdʒɪkl] adjetimologico/a
References in classic literature ?
Thus, some of the best and furthest-descended English words --the etymological Howards and Percys --are now democratised, nay, plebeianised --so to speak --in the New World.
Thus the two verbs , to severe and to separate, have the same etymological root, namely, to divide into several parts.
Summary: I deduce that Barney was not too pleased with the wife who, obviously, checked both 'pies' out in his etymological dictionary before calling him
In sections on Eustathios as a scholar, his style, and his place in history, they examine such topics as a technical approach to the etymological remarks in his commentary on Iliad Book Six, captain of Homer's guard: the reception of Eustathios in modern Europe, whether he was an orator or a grammarian in Ad Stylitam quendam Thassalonicensem, Achaeans on crusade, and more than a shepherd to his flock: Eustathios and the management of ecclesiastical property.
For undisclosed reasons the etymological background of words has been given.
Since the etymological root of b-r-a is to 'cut out and form", (2) this presupposes the use of material, something is formed from a previously existing substance.
Her agency's official website actually defines the etymological origins of 'ombudsman,' saying it comes from the Norwegian word 'umbodhsmadhr,' meaning 'administration man' or 'the king's representative.
The precise etymological route by which Huxley arrived at his coinage has been a matter of debate.
BRIGHOUSE Probus Club vice-chairman Allan Dobson gave a talk entitled It's Only Words - An Etymological Romp, at the February meeting.
His book, therefore, contains a host of etymological journeys tracing words both obscure and familiar, and I challenge anyone not to be enchanted by the results.
However, some believe that schlonged has a similar etymological status to that of words such as "screwed," which has changed meaning over the years from having a sexual connotation to meaning cheated or conned, according to a Talking Points Memo (http://talkingpointsmemo.
A Historical and Etymological Dictionary of American Sign Language