etymologically


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Encyclopedia.

et·y·mo·log·i·cal

 (ĕt′ə-mə-lŏj′ĭ-kəl) also et·y·mo·log·ic (-lŏj′ĭk)
adj.
Of or relating to etymology or based on the principles of etymology.

et′y·mo·log′i·cal·ly adv.
Translations

etymologically

[ˌetɪməˈlɒdʒɪkəlɪ] ADVetimológicamente

etymologically

[ˌɛtɪməˈlɒdʒɪklɪ] advetimologicamente
References in classic literature ?
Etymologically, the word means unbeliever, and its present
Etymologically drawn from the Latin term for "something owed" (debit-um), "debt" strikes a decidedly familiar chord at the turn of the twenty-first century.
Etymologically speaking the word shtick has Yiddish origins but is also closely related to German word 'stuck', not be confused with 'stuck-up'.
of Reno) investigates the phenomena of journalism in its etymologically original sense of producing reports for a local journal and how it has or has not changed over time, particularly in light of the media and information revolution of the last two decades.
The Hebrew word Tehom, meaning 'deep [waters],' is etymologically related to "Tiamat.
Etymologically, the word has been encrusted with as many definitions as the hordes of citizens who gathered in New York City's Zuccotti Park for two months and beyond in the fall of 2011.
Though etymologically exact ("born to"), the normative overtones of the term in contemporary English undo Zayas' basic point, that succour is not "natural" to the patriarchal family, but is found, by divine grace, in strangers.
In contrast, in both Tundra Enets as well as Nganasan, the etymologically related verb shows indeed the standard negation pattern of negative auxiliaries NEG.
Already, etymologically speaking, the word "politics" is a compound word, and its Latinized form is associated with lies.
I exclude hyphenated and etymologically related words but allow repeated affixes.
Those who see ousia, and its Doric equivalent osi a as etymologically related are committed to incessant flux; for Horky that includes Epicharmus and Empedocles.
Button's attention in this essay is on the hypothesis of polyphony--coexistence of more than one etymologically productive reading per graph, and particularly what I have called the "crypto-phonogram" aspect of the hypothesis--as proposed by Peter A.