etymology

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et·y·mol·o·gy

 (ĕt′ə-mŏl′ə-jē)
n. pl. et·y·mol·o·gies
1. The origin and historical development of a linguistic form as shown by determining its basic elements, earliest known use, and changes in form and meaning, tracing its transmission from one language to another, identifying its cognates in other languages, and reconstructing its ancestral form where possible.
2. The branch of linguistics that deals with etymologies.

[Middle English etimologie, from Old French ethimologie, from Medieval Latin ethimologia, from Latin etymologia, from Greek etumologiā : etumon, true sense of a word; see etymon + -logiā, -logy.]

etymology

(ˌɛtɪˈmɒlədʒɪ)
n, pl -gies
1. (Linguistics) the study of the sources and development of words and morphemes
2. (Linguistics) an account of the source and development of a word or morpheme
[C14: via Latin from Greek etumologia; see etymon, -logy]
etymological adj
ˌetymoˈlogically adv
ˌetyˈmologist n

et•y•mol•o•gy

(ˌɛt əˈmɒl ə dʒi)

n., pl. -gies.
1. the history of a particular word or element of a word.
2. an account of the origin and development of a word or word element.
3. the study of historical linguistic change, esp. as manifested in individual words.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Latin etymologia < Greek etymología; see etymon, -logy]
et`y•mo•log′i•cal (-məˈlɒdʒ ɪ kəl) adj.
et`y•mo•log′i•cal•ly, adv.
et`y•mol′o•gist, n.

etymology

the branch of linguistics that studies the origin and history of words. — etymologist, n. — etymologie, etymological, adj.
See also: Language
the study of the origin and history of individual words. — etymologist, n. — etymological, adj.
See also: Linguistics

etymology

1. The study of the origins and development of words.
2. The study of the history of words, tracing them back to their earliest recorded forms.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.etymology - a history of a word
account, chronicle, history, story - a record or narrative description of past events; "a history of France"; "he gave an inaccurate account of the plot to kill the president"; "the story of exposure to lead"
folk etymology - a popular but erroneous etymology
2.etymology - the study of the sources and development of words
linguistics - the scientific study of language
lexicostatistics - a statistical technique used in glottochronology; used to estimate how long ago different languages evolved from a common source language

etymology

noun derivation, word history, development of words, history of words, origin of words The etymology of the word 'neon' is the Greek for 'new'.
Translations
etimologia
etymologie
etymologi
etümoloogia
etymologia
etimologija
etimológiaszófejtés
orðsifjafræðiorðsifjar
語源語源学
etymologi
etymologiaźródłosłów
etimologie
etimologija
etymologi

etymology

[ˌetɪˈmɒlədʒɪ] Netimología f

etymology

[ˌɛtɪˈmɒlədʒi] n [word] → étymologie f

etymology

nEtymologie f

etymology

[ˌɛtɪˈmɒlədʒɪ] netimologia
References in classic literature ?
Casaubon's theory of the elements which made the seed of all tradition was not likely to bruise itself unawares against discoveries: it floated among flexible conjectures no more solid than those etymologies which seemed strong because of likeness in sound until it was shown that likeness in sound made them impossible: it was a method of interpretation which was not tested by the necessity of forming anything which had sharper collisions than an elaborate notion of Gog and Magog: it was as free from interruption as a plan for threading the stars together.
Also new examples of this development seem to be found; see etymologies 6 and 10 below.
Since the last conclusive overview, more than quarter of a century has passed (Ratsep 1983, 1986) and during this time the etymology of many stems has been adjusted and numerous new etymologies have been proposed.
Uncritical listings of popular and more learned etymologies for tango abound on the Internet.
They are creative etymologies that focus on words that mean different, sometimes opposing things today than they may have when they were first coined.
According to biographer Humphrey Carpenter, in his first weeks Tolkien was assigned etymologies of warm, wasp, water, wick, and winter, among others (qtd.
Each entry is identified by part of speech, inflections, order of senses, examples of usage and etymologies.
In the investigation of word origins or etymologies, it is often suggested that a word originated as an acronym.
In failing to show any connection between the phoneme/ morpheme maf and the modem meaning of the word mafia, Natella violates one of the principal rules of linguistic research, that "to prove an etymology, one must also disprove all other etymologies offered for the item in question" (David L.
Other language sources for bird names are also revealed in concise entries that include the etymologies and meanings of scientific and common names.
The faults of this essay--willful etymologies, an ignoring or ignorance of recent scholarship, the construction of large edifices on small or non-existent foundations (the notion that Shakespeare shared crank biological theories that he had probably never read), extreme tendentiousness--all this, plus enormous carelessness, is the norm of other chapters in this collection.
Year dates are scattered throughout Webster's Third, in definitions and in etymologies, ranging from many thousands of years BC to the very recent.