etymology


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et·y·mol·o·gy

 (ĕt′ə-mŏl′ə-jē)
n. pl. et·y·mol·o·gies
1. The origin and historical development of a linguistic form as shown by determining its basic elements, earliest known use, and changes in form and meaning, tracing its transmission from one language to another, identifying its cognates in other languages, and reconstructing its ancestral form where possible.
2. The branch of linguistics that deals with etymologies.

[Middle English etimologie, from Old French ethimologie, from Medieval Latin ethimologia, from Latin etymologia, from Greek etumologiā : etumon, true sense of a word; see etymon + -logiā, -logy.]

etymology

(ˌɛtɪˈmɒlədʒɪ)
n, pl -gies
1. (Linguistics) the study of the sources and development of words and morphemes
2. (Linguistics) an account of the source and development of a word or morpheme
[C14: via Latin from Greek etumologia; see etymon, -logy]
etymological adj
ˌetymoˈlogically adv
ˌetyˈmologist n

et•y•mol•o•gy

(ˌɛt əˈmɒl ə dʒi)

n., pl. -gies.
1. the history of a particular word or element of a word.
2. an account of the origin and development of a word or word element.
3. the study of historical linguistic change, esp. as manifested in individual words.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Latin etymologia < Greek etymología; see etymon, -logy]
et`y•mo•log′i•cal (-məˈlɒdʒ ɪ kəl) adj.
et`y•mo•log′i•cal•ly, adv.
et`y•mol′o•gist, n.

etymology

the branch of linguistics that studies the origin and history of words. — etymologist, n. — etymologie, etymological, adj.
See also: Language
the study of the origin and history of individual words. — etymologist, n. — etymological, adj.
See also: Linguistics

etymology

1. The study of the origins and development of words.
2. The study of the history of words, tracing them back to their earliest recorded forms.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.etymology - a history of a word
account, chronicle, history, story - a record or narrative description of past events; "a history of France"; "he gave an inaccurate account of the plot to kill the president"; "the story of exposure to lead"
folk etymology - a popular but erroneous etymology
2.etymology - the study of the sources and development of words
linguistics - the scientific study of language
lexicostatistics - a statistical technique used in glottochronology; used to estimate how long ago different languages evolved from a common source language

etymology

noun derivation, word history, development of words, history of words, origin of words The etymology of the word 'neon' is the Greek for 'new'.
Translations
etimologia
etymologie
etymologi
etümoloogia
etymologia
etimologija
etimológiaszófejtés
orðsifjafræðiorðsifjar
語源語源学
etymologi
etymologiaźródłosłów
etimologie
etimologija
etymologi

etymology

[ˌetɪˈmɒlədʒɪ] Netimología f

etymology

[ˌɛtɪˈmɒlədʒi] n [word] → étymologie f

etymology

nEtymologie f

etymology

[ˌɛtɪˈmɒlədʒɪ] netimologia
References in classic literature ?
Its grey front stood out well from the background of a rookery, whose cawing tenants were now on the wing: they flew over the lawn and grounds to alight in a great meadow, from which these were separated by a sunk fence, and where an array of mighty old thorn trees, strong, knotty, and broad as oaks, at once explained the etymology of the mansion's designation.
It appeared, in answer to my inquiries, that nobody had the least idea of the etymology of this terrible verb passive to be gormed; but that they all regarded it as constituting a most solemn imprecation.
The word, which I interpret the flying or floating island, is in the original LAPUTA, whereof I could never learn the true etymology.
This vampire which is amongst us is of himself so strong in person as twenty men, he is of cunning more than mortal, for his cunning be the growth of ages, he have still the aids of necromancy, which is, as his etymology imply, the divination by the dead, and all the dead that he can come nigh to are for him at command, he is brute, and more than brute, he is devil in callous, and the heart of him is not, he can, within his range, direct the elements, the storm, the fog, the thunder, he can command all the meaner things, the rat, and the owl, and the bat, the moth, and the fox, and the wolf, he can grow and become small, and he can at times vanish and come unknown.
You talk etymology and not morality; I say that we modern Epicureans are indifferent citizens.
Here again is fanciful etymology, ILEUS being similar to ILEOS (complaisant, gracious).
At the theatre entrance there was more banging and more bustle, and there were also Messrs Pyke and Pluck waiting to escort her to her box; and so polite were they, that Mr Pyke threatened with many oaths to 'smifligate' a very old man with a lantern who accidentally stumbled in her way--to the great terror of Mrs Nickleby, who, conjecturing more from Mr Pyke's excitement than any previous acquaintance with the etymology of the word that smifligation and bloodshed must be in the main one and the same thing, was alarmed beyond expression, lest something should occur.
The knowledge of Johnson's day was not adequate for tracing the history and etymology of words, and Johnson himself on being asked the reason for one of his numerous blunders could only reply, with his characteristic blunt frankness, 'sheer ignorance.
Orthography, etymology, syntax, and prosody, biography, astronomy, geography, and general cosmography, the sciences of compound proportion, algebra, land-surveying and levelling, vocal music, and drawing from models, were all at the ends of his ten chilled fingers.
Stelling concluded that Tom's brain, being peculiarly impervious to etymology and demonstrations, was peculiarly in need of being ploughed and harrowed by these patent implements; it was his favorite metaphor, that the classics and geometry constituted that culture of the mind which prepared it for the reception of any subsequent crop.
Stelling was not the man to enfeeble and emasculate his pupil's mind by simplifying and explaining, or to reduce the tonic effect of etymology by mixing it with smattering, extraneous information, such as is given to girls.
A rapidly improving stayer, Etymology failed to match the closing pace of Caulfield scorer Tarzino, who was a comfortable winner of the 2,500 metre contest.