euphemistic


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eu·phe·mism

 (yo͞o′fə-mĭz′əm)
n.
1. A mild, indirect, or vague term for one that is considered harsh, blunt, or offensive: "Euphemisms such as 'slumber room' ... abound in the funeral business" (Jessica Mitford).
2. The use of such terms: "Euphemism is common in hospital and medical facilities where bodily functions need to be discussed" (Diane F. Halpern).

[Greek euphēmismos, from euphēmizein, to use auspicious words, from euphēmiā, use of auspicious words : eu-, eu- + phēmē, speech; see bhā- in Indo-European roots.]

eu′phe·mist n.
eu′phe·mis′tic (-mĭs′tĭk) adj.
eu′phe·mis′ti·cal·ly adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.euphemistic - substituting a mild term for a harsher or distasteful one; "`peepee' is a common euphemistic term"
dysphemistic, offensive - substitute a harsher or distasteful term for a mild one ; "`nigger' is a dysphemistic term for `African-American'"

euphemistic

adjective polite, alternative, substitute, genteel the many euphemistic terms for death
Translations
تَلْطيفي
eufemistisk
euphémiqueeuphémiste
eufemisztikus
skrauthverfur; veigrunar-; fegrandi
eufemístico
eufemistický
kibarörtmeceli

euphemistic

[ˌjuːfɪˈmɪstɪk] ADJeufemístico

euphemistic

[ˌjuːfəˈmɪstɪk] adjeuphémique

euphemistic

euphemistic

[ˌjuːfəˈmɪstɪk] adjeufemistico/a

euphemism

(ˈjuːfəmizəm) noun
a pleasant name for something that is unpleasant. `Pass on' is a euphemism for `die'.
ˌeupheˈmistic adjective
References in periodicals archive ?
You don't need any useful skills or have to be creative, except perhaps the euphemistic "creative accounting", which you can pick up anywhere.
Almost everything discussed is couched in daft pseudo-speak that is euphemistic at best and dishonest at worst.
Like Clinton's ``partnership,'' Bush's euphemistic ``competition'' exists, not in reality, but only in the minds of American politicians who lack the moral courage to face the truth about China's nature, and who hope to hide their fear by redefining the English language.
Labour itself plans to impose cuts, even if they prefer to use the euphemistic term "efficiency savings", a phrase that could have been invented by George Orwell.
In some cases, this is true, but in many it is simply a euphemistic way of saying 'I have to go back to work in order to retain the lifestyle to which I've become accustomed', which is not the same thing at all.
They may cleverly avoid labeling them rate increases, offering instead a euphemistic title such as the ``trust transfer amount'' on current utility bills that effectively offsets the so-called 10 percent rate reduction that went into effect with deregulation.
Birmingham issued a euphemistic statement saying that the player would remain at St Andrew's until the end of the season 'subject to personal circumstances'.
And artificial fertilizers - made in huge furnaces that pull nitrogen out of the air and combine it with oxygen to make the nitrate and urea fertilizers that give farmers such phenomenal yields - can be replaced with what winds up at the Hyperion sewage treatment plant and is marketed at every Los Angeles nursery under a variety of euphemistic labels.
Writing in a national newspaper earlier this week Mr Prosor said: "Britain has become a hotbed for radical anti-Israeli views and a haven for disingenuous calls for a 'one-state solution' - a euphemistic name for a movement advocating Israel's destruction.
Alarm bells should clang at those euphemistic words.
The whole process of routine interaction demands a courteous covering of euphemistic gloss.
The suggestion that the Grand could be 'gracefully replaced' by a modern building is delightfully euphemistic.