euphuism

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eu·phu·ism

 (yo͞o′fyo͞o-ĭz′əm)
n.
1. An affectedly elegant literary style of the late 1500s and early 1600s, characterized by elaborate alliteration, antitheses, and similes.
2. Affected elegance of language.

[After Euphues, , a character in Euphues, the Anatomy of Wit and Euphues and his England by John Lyly, from Greek euphuēs, shapely : eu-, eu- + phuein, to grow, bring forth; see bheuə- in Indo-European roots.]

eu′phu·ist n.
eu′phu·is′tic, eu′phu·is′ti·cal adj.
eu′phu·is′ti·cal·ly adv.

euphuism

(ˈjuːfjuːˌɪzəm)
n
1. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) an artificial prose style of the Elizabethan period, marked by extreme use of antithesis, alliteration, and extended similes and allusions
2. any stylish affectation in speech or writing, esp a rhetorical device or expression
[C16: after Euphues, prose romance by John Lyly]
ˈeuphuist n
ˌeuphuˈistic, ˌeuphuˈistical adj
ˌeuphuˈistically adv

eu•phu•ism

(ˈyu fyuˌɪz əm)

n.
1. an affected style in imitation of that of John Lyly, fashionable in Elizabethan England and characterized chiefly by excessive antitheses, alliteration, and elaborate similes.
2. any similar ornate style of writing or speaking.
[1590–1600; after Euphues, the main character in Lyly's works; see -ism]
eu′phu•ist, n.
eu`phu•is′tic, eu`phu•is′ti•cal, adj.
eu`phu•is′ti•cal•ly, adv.

Euphuism

1. an elaborate prose style invented by John Lyly c. 1580, characterized by bountiful figures of speech, Latinisms, extended similes, frequent antitheses, and highly involved syntax.
2. any similar ornate style of writing or speaking. Cf. Gongorism. — euphuist, n. — euphuistic, adj.
See also: Literary Style

euphuism

A high-flown rhetorical literary style.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.euphuism - any artificially elegant style of language
expressive style, style - a way of expressing something (in language or art or music etc.) that is characteristic of a particular person or group of people or period; "all the reporters were expected to adopt the style of the newspaper"
Gongorism - an affected elegance of style that was introduced into Spanish literature by the poet Gongora
2.euphuism - an elegant style of prose of the Elizabethan period; characterized by balance and antithesis and alliteration and extended similes with and allusions to nature and mythology
prose - ordinary writing as distinguished from verse
References in classic literature ?
That lady, therefore, entering in a stately manner what plebeians might have called the school-room, but what, in the patrician language of the head of the Nuns' House, was euphuistically, not to say round-aboutedly, denominated 'the apartment allotted to study,' and saying with a forensic air,