evacuate


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e·vac·u·ate

 (ĭ-văk′yo͞o-āt′)
v. e·vac·u·at·ed, e·vac·u·at·ing, e·vac·u·ates
v.tr.
1.
a. To withdraw or depart from; vacate: The coastal areas were evacuated before the hurricane made landfall.
b. To withdraw or send away (troops or inhabitants) from a threatened area: The Coast Guard helped evacuate the citizens after the flood.
c. To relinquish military possession or occupation of (a town, for example).
2. To excrete or discharge waste matter from (the bowel, for example).
3.
a. To empty or remove the contents of (a closed space or container).
b. To empty or remove (fluid, for example) from a closed space or container.
c. To create a vacuum in.
v.intr.
1. To withdraw from or vacate a place or area, especially as a protective measure: The mayor urged the residents to evacuate before the hurricane struck.
2. To excrete waste matter from the body.

[Middle English evacuaten, to expel (excessive or morbid humors) from the body (according to medieval theories of physiology), from Latin ēvacuāre, ēvacuāt-, to empty out : ē-, ex-, ex- + vacuus, empty (from vacāre, to be empty; see euə- in Indo-European roots).]

e·vac′u·a′tive adj.
e·vac′u·a′tor n.

evacuate

(ɪˈvækjʊˌeɪt)
vb (mainly tr)
1. (also intr) to withdraw or cause to withdraw from (a place of danger) to a place of greater safety
2. to make empty by removing the contents of
3. (Physiology) (also intr) physiol
a. to eliminate or excrete (faeces); defecate
b. to discharge (any waste product) from (a part of the body)
4. (General Physics) (tr) to create a vacuum in (a bulb, flask, reaction vessel, etc)
[C16: from Latin ēvacuāre to void, from vacuus empty]
eˌvacuˈation n
eˈvacuative adj
eˈvacuˌator n

e•vac•u•ate

(ɪˈvæk yuˌeɪt)

v. -at•ed, -at•ing. v.t.
1. to leave empty; vacate.
2. to remove (persons or things) from a place, esp. for reasons of safety.
3. to remove persons from (a city, building, area, etc.), esp. for reasons of safety.
4.
a. to remove (troops, civilians, etc.) from a war zone, combat area, etc.
b. to withdraw from (an occupied town, fort, etc.).
5. to discharge or eject, esp. from the bowels.
6. to produce a vacuum in (a vessel, electron tube, etc.).
v.i.
7. to leave a place because of military or other dangers.
8. to void; defecate.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Latin ēvacuātus, past participle of ēvacuāre=ē- e- + vacuāre to empty; see vacuum, -ate1]
e•vac′u•a`tor, n.

evacuate


Past participle: evacuated
Gerund: evacuating

Imperative
evacuate
evacuate
Present
I evacuate
you evacuate
he/she/it evacuates
we evacuate
you evacuate
they evacuate
Preterite
I evacuated
you evacuated
he/she/it evacuated
we evacuated
you evacuated
they evacuated
Present Continuous
I am evacuating
you are evacuating
he/she/it is evacuating
we are evacuating
you are evacuating
they are evacuating
Present Perfect
I have evacuated
you have evacuated
he/she/it has evacuated
we have evacuated
you have evacuated
they have evacuated
Past Continuous
I was evacuating
you were evacuating
he/she/it was evacuating
we were evacuating
you were evacuating
they were evacuating
Past Perfect
I had evacuated
you had evacuated
he/she/it had evacuated
we had evacuated
you had evacuated
they had evacuated
Future
I will evacuate
you will evacuate
he/she/it will evacuate
we will evacuate
you will evacuate
they will evacuate
Future Perfect
I will have evacuated
you will have evacuated
he/she/it will have evacuated
we will have evacuated
you will have evacuated
they will have evacuated
Future Continuous
I will be evacuating
you will be evacuating
he/she/it will be evacuating
we will be evacuating
you will be evacuating
they will be evacuating
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been evacuating
you have been evacuating
he/she/it has been evacuating
we have been evacuating
you have been evacuating
they have been evacuating
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been evacuating
you will have been evacuating
he/she/it will have been evacuating
we will have been evacuating
you will have been evacuating
they will have been evacuating
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been evacuating
you had been evacuating
he/she/it had been evacuating
we had been evacuating
you had been evacuating
they had been evacuating
Conditional
I would evacuate
you would evacuate
he/she/it would evacuate
we would evacuate
you would evacuate
they would evacuate
Past Conditional
I would have evacuated
you would have evacuated
he/she/it would have evacuated
we would have evacuated
you would have evacuated
they would have evacuated
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.evacuate - move out of an unsafe location into safetyevacuate - move out of an unsafe location into safety; "After the earthquake, residents were evacuated"
move - change residence, affiliation, or place of employment; "We moved from Idaho to Nebraska"; "The basketball player moved from one team to another"
2.evacuate - empty completely; "evacuate the bottle"
empty - make void or empty of contents; "Empty the box"; "The alarm emptied the building"
3.evacuate - move people from their homes or country
displace - cause to move, usually with force or pressure; "the refugees were displaced by the war"
4.evacuate - create a vacuum in (a bulb, flask, reaction vessel)
empty - make void or empty of contents; "Empty the box"; "The alarm emptied the building"
5.evacuate - excrete or discharge from the body
egest, excrete, eliminate, pass - eliminate from the body; "Pass a kidney stone"
suction - empty or clean (a body cavity) by the force of suction; "suction the uterus in an abortion"

evacuate

verb
1. remove, clear, withdraw, expel, move out, send to a safe place 18,000 people have been evacuated from the city.
2. abandon, leave, clear, desert, quit, depart (from), withdraw from, pull out of, move out of, relinquish, vacate, forsake, decamp from The residents have evacuated the area.

evacuate

verb
1. To remove the contents of:
2. To discharge (wastes or foreign substances) from the body:
Medicine: purge.
Translations
يُجْلي، يُخْلييُخْلِييُخْلي، يُخْرِج
evakuovat
evakuereforladerømme
evakuoida
evakuiratiisprazniti
evakuál
flytja á brotttæma, flytja á brott; yfirgefa
避難させる避難する
피난시키다
evakuacijaevakuoti
atbrīvotevakuēt
evakuovať
evakuiratiizprazniti
evakuera
อพยพ
sơ tán

evacuate

[ɪˈvækjʊeɪt]
A. VT
1. [+ people] → evacuar
he was evacuated to a hospital in Haifalo evacuaron a un hospital de Haifa
2. [+ building, area] → evacuar
3. (frm) [+ bowels] → evacuar
B. VI
1. [people, troops] civilians were given the order to evacuateles dieron órdenes a los civiles de que evacuaran la zona
the British decided to evacuatelos británicos decidieron abandonar el lugar
2. (frm) [bowels] → evacuar

evacuate

[ɪˈvækjueɪt] vt
(= remove to safety) [+ people] → évacuer
to be evacuated → être évacué(e)
(= clear of people) [+ place] → évacuer
(= leave) [+ place] → évacuer

evacuate

vt
(= leave) fort, houseräumen
(= clear) danger arearäumen; civilians, women, childrenevakuieren (from aus, to nach)
bowelsentleeren
vi all the villagers had to evacuatealle Bewohner mussten das Dorf räumen

evacuate

[ɪˈvækjʊˌeɪt] vt (people) → sfollare; (building, area) (Med) → evacuare

evacuate

(iˈvӕkjueit) verb
1. to leave or withdraw from (a place), especially because of danger. The troops evacuated their position because of the enemy's advance.
2. to cause (inhabitants etc) to leave a place, especially because of danger. Children were evacuated from the city to the country during the war.
eˌvacuˈation noun

evacuate

يُخْلِي evakuovat evakuere evakuieren εκκενώνω evacuar evakuoida évacuer evakuirati evacuare 避難させる 피난시키다 evacueren evakuere ewakuować evacuar эвакуировать evakuera อพยพ boşaltmak sơ tán 疏散

e·vac·u·ate

vt. evacuar, eliminar; defecar; vaciar,
Mex. obrar.

evacuate

vt evacuar
References in classic literature ?
Tell General Fournier he has barely time to evacuate his position, force a way through this crowd, and cross the bridge.
THE Tungurahua volcano in Ecuador is billowing ash into the sky and sending super-hot pyroclastic flows surging down its slopes, causing authorities to evacuate nearby villages.
Heavy rains fed rivers under the Tatra mountains in northern Slovakia, flooding towns, including parts of Kezmarok, and forcing people to evacuate their homes.
Police were in attendance and helped evacuate the area around the building at an industrial park on Cobham Road, Bordesley Green.
Chapters cover recommended personal inventory and supplies to keep handy in case of emergency, homeowner's insurance concerns, how to evacuate if there is need, financial planning to take into account, what to take when evacuating by car, food and water concerns for after the storm, and much more.
Eight homes were evacuated as a precautionary measure and nearby St Teilo's High School was told of the drama, but did not need to evacuate any pupils.
Waldport officials also didn't evacuate or sound the city's sirens, but they did move equipment in the "tsunami inundation zone" to high ground.
Following requests of our citizens, who have contacted the Turkish Embassy in Cairo and Alexandria, Turkish Airlines made additional runs to evacuate our citizens," said the MFA.
Later on Monday, Bulgaria's cabinet will send the government's Airbus on at least one more flight to Tripoli to evacuate Bulgarian citizens stranded there by the raging civil war.
The undersecretary of the country Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Rahmtallah Mohamed Osman, on Tuesday asked the UK ambassador in Khartoum, Nicholas Kay, for his country's help to evacuate Sudanese citizens from Libya.
Six firefighters wearing breathing apparatus went into the building to evacuate residents and to tackle the flames with hose reels.
Johnsonite's Safe-T-First low location egress routing system helps provide an advanced measure of safety to assist building occupants to evacuate a building during periods of sudden darkness.