evasion


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e·va·sion

 (ĭ-vā′zhən)
n.
1. The act or an instance of evading.
2. A means of evading; a subterfuge.

[Middle English evasioun, from Old French evasion, from Late Latin ēvāsiō, ēvāsiōn-, from Latin ēvāsus, past participle of ēvādere, to evade; see evade.]

evasion

(ɪˈveɪʒən)
n
1. the act of evading or escaping, esp from a distasteful duty, responsibility, etc, by trickery, cunning, or illegal means: tax evasion.
2. trickery, cunning, or deception used to dodge a question, duty, etc; means of evading
[C15: from Late Latin ēvāsiō, from Latin ēvādere to go forth; see evade]

e•va•sion

(ɪˈveɪ ʒən)

n.
1. an act or instance of escaping, avoiding, or shirking something: evasion of one's duty; tax evasion.
2. the avoiding of an accusation, question, or the like, as by a subterfuge.
3. a means of evading; subterfuge.
[1375–1425; late Middle English < Latin ēvāsiō=ēvād(ere) to go out (see evade) + -tiō -tion]
e•va′sion•al, adj.

evasion

The process whereby individuals who are isolated in hostile or unfriendly territory avoid capture with the goal of successfully returning to areas under friendly control. See also evasion and recovery.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.evasion - a statement that is not literally false but that cleverly avoids an unpleasant truthevasion - a statement that is not literally false but that cleverly avoids an unpleasant truth
deception, misrepresentation, deceit - a misleading falsehood
indirect expression, circumlocution - an indirect way of expressing something
doublespeak - any language that pretends to communicate but actually does not
hedging, hedge - an intentionally noncommittal or ambiguous statement; "when you say `maybe' you are just hedging"
cavil, quibble, quiddity - an evasion of the point of an argument by raising irrelevant distinctions or objections
2.evasion - the deliberate act of failing to pay money; "his evasion of all his creditors"; "he was indicted for nonpayment"
tax evasion - the deliberate failure to pay taxes (usually by making a false report)
commerce, commercialism, mercantilism - transactions (sales and purchases) having the objective of supplying commodities (goods and services)
3.evasion - nonperformance of something distasteful (as by deceit or trickery) that you are supposed to do; "his evasion of his clear duty was reprehensible"; "that escape from the consequences is possible but unattractive"
negligence, nonperformance, carelessness, neglect - failure to act with the prudence that a reasonable person would exercise under the same circumstances
escape mechanism - a form of behavior that evades unpleasant realities
malingering, skulking - evading duty or work by pretending to be incapacitated; "they developed a test to detect malingering"
goldbricking, goofing off, shirking, slacking, soldiering - the evasion of work or duty
circumvention - the act of evading by going around
4.evasion - the act of physically escaping from something (an opponent or a pursuer or an unpleasant situation) by some adroit maneuver
escape, flight - the act of escaping physically; "he made his escape from the mental hospital"; "the canary escaped from its cage"; "his flight was an indication of his guilt"
eluding, elusion, slip - the act of avoiding capture (especially by cunning)
evasive action, maneuver, manoeuvre - an action aimed at evading an opponent
dodge - a quick evasive movement

evasion

noun
1. avoidance, escape, dodging, shirking, cop-out (slang), circumvention, elusion an evasion of responsibility
2. deception, shuffling, cunning, fudging, pretext, ruse, artifice, trickery, subterfuge, equivocation, prevarication, sophistry, evasiveness, obliqueness, sophism They face accusations from the Opposition Party of evasion and cover-up.

evasion

noun
The act, an instance, or a means of avoiding:
Translations
تَهَرُّب، تَمَلُّص
unddragelseundvigelse
undandráttur
kaçınma

evasion

[ɪˈveɪʒən] Nevasión f; (= evasive answer etc) → evasiva f
see also tax C

evasion

[ɪˈveɪʒən] n
[duty, responsibility] → dérobade f
an evasion of responsibility → une dérobade
(= refusal to tell the truth) → faux-fuyant m

evasion

n
(of question etc)Ausweichen nt (→ of vor +dat)
(= evasive answer etc)Ausflucht f

evasion

[ɪˈveɪʒn] nevasione f

evade

(iˈveid) verb
to escape or avoid by eg trickery or skill.
eˈvasion (-ʒən) noun
eˈvasive (-siv) adjective
1. having the purpose of evading.
2. not frank and direct. He gave evasive answers.
eˈvasively adverb
eˈvasiveness noun
References in classic literature ?
When a prisoner of style escapes it's called an evasion.
Evasion was the only escape your present life had left her, from telling a downright falsehood.
Any one might have seen in her haggard face that there was no suppression or evasion so far.
That was a feeble evasion, but Godfrey was not fond of lying, and, not being sufficiently aware that no sort of duplicity can long flourish without the help of vocal falsehoods, he was quite unprepared with invented motives.
who shall tempt with wandring feet The dark unbottom'd infinite Abyss And through the palpable obscure find out His uncouth way, or spread his aerie flight Upborn with indefatigable wings Over the vast abrupt, ere he arrive The happy Ile; what strength, what art can then Suffice, or what evasion bear him safe Through the strict Senteries and Stations thick Of Angels watching round?
After much debate, they concluded unanimously, that I was only RELPLUM SCALCATH, which is interpreted literally LUSUS NATURAE; a determination exactly agreeable to the modern philosophy of Europe, whose professors, disdaining the old evasion of occult causes, whereby the followers of Aristotle endeavoured in vain to disguise their ignorance, have invented this wonderful solution of all difficulties, to the unspeakable advancement of human knowledge.
For them a wall is not an evasion, as for us people who think and consequently do nothing; it is not an excuse for turning aside, an excuse for which we are always very glad, though we scarcely believe in it ourselves, as a rule.
Come, D'Artagnan, don't let us play a sidelong game; your hesitation, your evasion, tells me at once on whose side you are; for that party no one dares openly to recruit, and when people recruit for it, it is with averted eyes and humble voice.
And then as the duchess went on relating a mot with which her mother had snubbed the great Napoleon, it occurred to Newman that her evasion of a chapter of French history more interesting to himself might possibly be the result of an extreme consideration for his feelings.
His evasion, of course, was the height of insolence, but it argued some resource and nerve.
But it would be as cautious and as shifty; the conviction of its probable, in fact its already quite sensible, quite audible evasion of pursuit grew for him from night to night, laying on him finally a rigour to which nothing in his life had been comparable.
There was a brutal directness about his methods which made evasion difficult.