eviscerate


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e·vis·cer·ate

 (ĭ-vĭs′ə-rāt′)
v. e·vis·cer·at·ed, e·vis·cer·at·ing, e·vis·cer·ates
v.tr.
1. To remove the entrails of; disembowel.
2. To take away a vital or essential part of; weaken, damage, or destroy: a compromise that eviscerated the proposed bill.
3. Medicine
a. To remove the contents of (an organ).
b. To remove an organ, such as an eye, from (a patient).
v.intr. Medicine
To protrude through a wound or surgical incision.

[Latin ēviscerāre, ēviscerāt- : ē-, ex-, ex- + viscera, internal organs; see viscera.]

e·vis′cer·a′tion n.

eviscerate

(ɪˈvɪsəˌreɪt)
vb
1. (tr) to remove the internal organs of; disembowel
2. (tr) to deprive of meaning or significance
3. (Surgery) (tr) surgery to remove the contents of (the eyeball or other organ)
4. (Surgery) (intr) surgery (of the viscera) to protrude through a weakened abdominal incision after an operation
adj
having been disembowelled
[C17: from Latin ēviscerāre to disembowel, from viscera entrails]
eˌviscerˈation n
eˈviscerˌator n

e•vis•cer•ate

(v. ɪˈvɪs əˌreɪt; adj. -ər ɪt, -əˌreɪt)

v. -at•ed, -at•ing,
adj. v.t.
1. to remove the entrails from.
2. to deprive of vital or essential parts: The censors eviscerated the book.
3. to remove the contents of (a body organ) by surgery.
adj.
4. having had the entrails removed.
[1600–10; < Latin ēviscerātus. See viscera.]
e•vis`cer•a′tion, n.
e•vis′cer•a`tor, n.

eviscerate


Past participle: eviscerated
Gerund: eviscerating

Imperative
eviscerate
eviscerate
Present
I eviscerate
you eviscerate
he/she/it eviscerates
we eviscerate
you eviscerate
they eviscerate
Preterite
I eviscerated
you eviscerated
he/she/it eviscerated
we eviscerated
you eviscerated
they eviscerated
Present Continuous
I am eviscerating
you are eviscerating
he/she/it is eviscerating
we are eviscerating
you are eviscerating
they are eviscerating
Present Perfect
I have eviscerated
you have eviscerated
he/she/it has eviscerated
we have eviscerated
you have eviscerated
they have eviscerated
Past Continuous
I was eviscerating
you were eviscerating
he/she/it was eviscerating
we were eviscerating
you were eviscerating
they were eviscerating
Past Perfect
I had eviscerated
you had eviscerated
he/she/it had eviscerated
we had eviscerated
you had eviscerated
they had eviscerated
Future
I will eviscerate
you will eviscerate
he/she/it will eviscerate
we will eviscerate
you will eviscerate
they will eviscerate
Future Perfect
I will have eviscerated
you will have eviscerated
he/she/it will have eviscerated
we will have eviscerated
you will have eviscerated
they will have eviscerated
Future Continuous
I will be eviscerating
you will be eviscerating
he/she/it will be eviscerating
we will be eviscerating
you will be eviscerating
they will be eviscerating
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been eviscerating
you have been eviscerating
he/she/it has been eviscerating
we have been eviscerating
you have been eviscerating
they have been eviscerating
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been eviscerating
you will have been eviscerating
he/she/it will have been eviscerating
we will have been eviscerating
you will have been eviscerating
they will have been eviscerating
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been eviscerating
you had been eviscerating
he/she/it had been eviscerating
we had been eviscerating
you had been eviscerating
they had been eviscerating
Conditional
I would eviscerate
you would eviscerate
he/she/it would eviscerate
we would eviscerate
you would eviscerate
they would eviscerate
Past Conditional
I would have eviscerated
you would have eviscerated
he/she/it would have eviscerated
we would have eviscerated
you would have eviscerated
they would have eviscerated
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.eviscerate - surgically remove a part of a structure or an organ
practice of medicine, medicine - the learned profession that is mastered by graduate training in a medical school and that is devoted to preventing or alleviating or curing diseases and injuries; "he studied medicine at Harvard"
remove, take away, withdraw, take - remove something concrete, as by lifting, pushing, or taking off, or remove something abstract; "remove a threat"; "remove a wrapper"; "Remove the dirty dishes from the table"; "take the gun from your pocket"; "This machine withdraws heat from the environment"
2.eviscerate - remove the contents of; "eviscerate the stomach"
practice of medicine, medicine - the learned profession that is mastered by graduate training in a medical school and that is devoted to preventing or alleviating or curing diseases and injuries; "he studied medicine at Harvard"
empty - make void or empty of contents; "Empty the box"; "The alarm emptied the building"
3.eviscerate - remove the entrails of; "draw a chicken"
remove, take away, withdraw, take - remove something concrete, as by lifting, pushing, or taking off, or remove something abstract; "remove a threat"; "remove a wrapper"; "Remove the dirty dishes from the table"; "take the gun from your pocket"; "This machine withdraws heat from the environment"
4.eviscerate - take away a vital or essential part of; "the compromise among the parties eviscerated the bill that had been proposed"
devitalise, devitalize - sap of life or energy; "The recession devitalized the economy"
Adj.1.eviscerate - having been disembowelled
injured - harmed; "injured soldiers"; "injured feelings"

eviscerate

verb gut, draw, paunch, disembowel, remove the internal organs of strangling and eviscerating rabbits for the pot
Translations
kiteyttäämitätöidäpoistaasuolistaa

eviscerate

[ɪˈvɪsəreɪt] VTdestripar

eviscerate

vtausnehmen; personentleiben
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