exaction


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Related to exaction: extortionate, oppressive exaction

ex·ac·tion

 (ĭg-zăk′shən)
n.
1.
a. The act of exacting.
b. Excessive or unjust demand; extortion.
2. Something exacted.

exaction

(ɪɡˈzækʃən)
n
1. the act or an instance of exacting, esp money
2. an excessive or harsh demand, esp for money; extortion
3. (Commerce) a sum or payment exacted

ex•ac•tion

(ɪgˈzæk ʃən)

n.
1. the act of exacting; extortion: the exactions of usury.
2. an amount or sum exacted.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Latin]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.exaction - act of demanding or levying by force or authority; "exaction of tribute"; "exaction of various dues and fees"
demand - the act of demanding; "the kidnapper's exorbitant demands for money"
extortion - unjust exaction (as by the misuse of authority); "the extortion by dishonest officials of fees for performing their sworn duty"

exaction

noun
1. The act of demanding:
2. A fixed amount of money charged for a privilege or service:
Translations

exaction

[ɪgˈzækʃən] Nexacción f

exaction

n
(= act, of money) → Eintreiben nt; (of promises)Abverlangen nt; (of obedience)Fordern nt
(= money exacted)Forderung f; (= excessive demand)überzogene Forderung
References in classic literature ?
But the stern customs of his people had made too severe an exaction of the feeble old man.
His is the exaction of the apostle, who speaks but for Christ, when he says--"Whosoever will come after me, let him deny himself, and take up his cross and follow me.
Let him name the ransom at which he rates our liberty, and it shall be paid, providing the exaction is suited to our means.
But the apartment was saddened in its aspect by the absence of much of the homely wealth which had once adorned it; for the exaction of repeated fines, and his own neglect of temporal affairs, had greatly impoverished the owner.
Which is the more flattering exaction it is hard to say; but there is the fact that in listening for upwards of twenty years to the sea-talk that goes on afloat and ashore I have never detected the true note of animosity.
Poyser (too officiously, Tom thought) interfered to prevent the exaction of the penalty.
All was, alas, worse than vanity--injustice, punishment, exaction, death.
Strype the washerwoman against Stubbs's unjust exaction on the score of her drying-ground, and he would himself-scrutinize a calumny against Mrs.
But when we got home - to my new, delightful home - I was so happy and he was so kind that I freely forgave him all; and I was beginning to think my lot too happy, and my husband actually too good for me, if not too good for this world, when, on the second Sunday after our arrival, he shocked and horrified me by another instance of his unreasonable exaction.
As Eleanor Fairlie (aged seven-and-thirty), she was always talking pretentious nonsense, and always worrying the unfortunate men with every small exaction which a vain and foolish woman can impose on long-suffering male humanity.
He was punctilious in the exaction of this ceremony.
These guidelines called for the exaction of public easements from permit applicants in any case where there would be an "intensification of use," (67) without concern for the adequacy of existing public access.