exaction

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ex·ac·tion

 (ĭg-zăk′shən)
n.
1.
a. The act of exacting.
b. Excessive or unjust demand; extortion.
2. Something exacted.

exaction

(ɪɡˈzækʃən)
n
1. the act or an instance of exacting, esp money
2. an excessive or harsh demand, esp for money; extortion
3. (Commerce) a sum or payment exacted

ex•ac•tion

(ɪgˈzæk ʃən)

n.
1. the act of exacting; extortion: the exactions of usury.
2. an amount or sum exacted.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Latin]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.exaction - act of demanding or levying by force or authority; "exaction of tribute"; "exaction of various dues and fees"
demand - the act of demanding; "the kidnapper's exorbitant demands for money"
extortion - unjust exaction (as by the misuse of authority); "the extortion by dishonest officials of fees for performing their sworn duty"

exaction

noun
1. The act of demanding:
2. A fixed amount of money charged for a privilege or service:
Translations

exaction

[ɪgˈzækʃən] Nexacción f

exaction

n
(= act, of money) → Eintreiben nt; (of promises)Abverlangen nt; (of obedience)Fordern nt
(= money exacted)Forderung f; (= excessive demand)überzogene Forderung
References in classic literature ?
When their substance is drained away, the peasantry will be afflicted by heavy exactions.
He did not know that the priest who met him with the cross oppressed the peasants by his exactions, and that the pupils' parents wept at having to let him take their children and secured their release by heavy payments.
It was plain, even in the brief time given me for reflection, that in dealing with this girl ordinary methods would not do, and ordinary exactions were needless.
But it was at night that he talked openly, forgetting the exactions of his stage.
Clare had never pretended to govern himself by any religious obligation; and a certain fineness of nature gave him such an instinctive view of the extent of the requirements of Christianity, that he shrank, by anticipation, from what he felt would be the exactions of his own conscience, if he once did resolve to assume them.
The inhabitants of the Atlantic frontier are all of them deeply interested in this provision for naval protection, and if they have hitherto been suffered to sleep quietly in their beds; if their property has remained safe against the predatory spirit of licentious adventurers; if their maritime towns have not yet been compelled to ransom themselves from the terrors of a conflagration, by yielding to the exactions of daring and sudden invaders, these instances of good fortune are not to be ascribed to the capacity of the existing government for the protection of those from whom it claims allegiance, but to causes that are fugitive and fallacious.
Which means, monsieur," replied De Guiche, now rather pale, "that I caused these tents to be raised as habitations for myself and my friends, as a shelter for the ambassadors of France, as the only place of refuge which your exactions have left us in the town; and that I and those who are with me, shall remain in them, at least, until an authority more powerful, and more supreme, than your own shall dismiss me from them.
I found the exactions of the profession somewhat too much for my delicate state of body; and, discovering, at last, that I was knocked all out of shape, so that I didn't know very well what to make of the matter, and so that my friends, when they met me in the street, couldn't tell that I was Peter Proffit at all, it occurred to me that the best expedient I could adopt was to alter my line of business.
There was something about the luxury of the Welland house and the density of the Welland atmosphere, so charged with minute observances and exactions, that always stole into his system like a narcotic.
His is the exaction of the apostle, who speaks but for Christ, when he says--"Whosoever will come after me, let him deny himself, and take up his cross and follow me.
But when we got home - to my new, delightful home - I was so happy and he was so kind that I freely forgave him all; and I was beginning to think my lot too happy, and my husband actually too good for me, if not too good for this world, when, on the second Sunday after our arrival, he shocked and horrified me by another instance of his unreasonable exaction.
Which is the more flattering exaction it is hard to say; but there is the fact that in listening for upwards of twenty years to the sea-talk that goes on afloat and ashore I have never detected the true note of animosity.